Getting on with interviews

This piece is written by Heather Crump, Aberystwyth University, BES Conservation Ecology SIG Early Career Representative @hec72012. It has also been posted on the BES and ZSL Wild Science blogs. Many doors can open as a result of a PhD, whether they lead to continued research, lectureships or work with a non-governmental organisation; none are to be left unexplored. However, finding the key to open … Continue reading Getting on with interviews

Jazz-band ecosystem monitoring

In this post Adel Heenan and Kelvin Gorospe discuss their recent Practitioner’s Perspective article ‘Ecosystem monitoring for ecosystem-based management: using a polycentric approach to balance information trade-offs‘ Long-term ecosystem monitoring can be used to take the pulse of an ecosystem, much like a routine check-up with your doctor. Medical analogies like this are common in our field, as we work for the Pacific Reef Assessment and Monitoring Program (RAMP) … Continue reading Jazz-band ecosystem monitoring

The nuances of networking and the crux of the CV

This piece is written by Lydia Cole, Rezatec, BES Conservation Ecology SIG Liaison Officer @lydcole. It has also been posted on the BES and ZSL Wild Science blogs. “Who enjoys networking?” Silence. And then we all hear the news: our first task is a game, which consists in spending 20 minutes networking our very hardest.  The rule is simple: the winner of the ‘competition’ is … Continue reading The nuances of networking and the crux of the CV

Showing the way for carnivore conservation: lions can survive without fences with the help of Community Conservancies

In this post Sara Blackburn discusses her paper ‘Human–wildlife conflict, benefit sharing and the survival of lions in pastoralist community-based conservancies‘ Recent work on African lions indicates that they’re in trouble. Widespread declines have been identified across the continent, except in intensively managed fenced reserves, signposting a bleak future for free-ranging lions. This is due to conflict with people; lions kill livestock and, understandably, they … Continue reading Showing the way for carnivore conservation: lions can survive without fences with the help of Community Conservancies

Publicising your work to support your career aspirations

This piece is written by Katherine Baldock NERC Knowledge Exchange Fellow, University of Bristol, BES Conservation SIG early career rep @Kath_Baldock This blog has also been posted on the BES and ZSL Wild Science blogs. Publicising your research and learning to communicate with a range of audiences is key to raising your profile as a researcher, especially in the early career stages when you may … Continue reading Publicising your work to support your career aspirations

Writing successful grant applications: power in numbers

This piece is written by Claudia Gray, ZSL, BES Conservation SIG Communications Officer and has also been posted on the BES and ZSL Wild Science blogs. To contribute successfully to biodiversity conservation, you will almost certainly have to get money from somewhere. Your salary, your research assistants, your equipment, any engagement with stakeholders and ultimately the conservation of your focal habitat or species are likely … Continue reading Writing successful grant applications: power in numbers

Environmental DNA and crayfish management

In this post Matthew Dougherty discusses his recent paper ‘Environmental DNA (eDNA) detects the invasive rusty crayfish Orconectes rusticus at low abundances‘ Tangled buoy strings, lost traps, pinched fingers, sweaty brows, and boats smeared with beef liver: these images define the experiences of countless managers and scientists who use baited trapping to monitor crayfish invasions, especially in lakes of the upper Midwest, USA. While these … Continue reading Environmental DNA and crayfish management

The evolutionary canary in the coal mine

In this post Executive Editor Marc Cadotte discusses a paper he recently handled by François Keck and colleagues ‘Linking phylogenetic similarity and pollution sensitivity to develop ecological assessment methods: a test with river diatoms‘ Like canaries in coal mines, species can provide important information about deteriorating environmental conditions. A whole sub-discipline of environmental biomonitoring has emerged to provide the necessary tools to evaluate biological responses … Continue reading The evolutionary canary in the coal mine

Fledging the nest: an early career event for the next generation of Conservation Ecologists

This piece is written by Lydia Cole, Rezatec, BES Conservation Ecology SIG Liaison Officer @lydcole, Katherine Baldock, University of Bristol, BES Conservation Ecology SIG Early Career Rep @Kath_Baldock, Claudia Gray, Zoological Society of London, BES Conservation Ecology SIG Communications Officer @ClaudiaLGray, Heather Crump, Aberystwyth University, BES Conservation Ecology SIG Early Career Rep @hec72012 This blog has also been posted on the BES and ZSL Wild … Continue reading Fledging the nest: an early career event for the next generation of Conservation Ecologists

Giant Panda Conservation

Minerva Singh is a PhD Candidate at the University of Cambridge and she is involved with the BES Conservation Ecology Special Interest Group. In this post Minerva looks at whether zoos can help in the conservation of charismatic megafauna. For International Women’s Day, we asked Minerva about her career in science and the challenges and improvements she is seeing in STEM. You can read all … Continue reading Giant Panda Conservation