Prioritizing conservation and management efforts with new methods to predict invasive species occurrence and impact

In this post Johanna Bradie discusses her recent paper with Brian Leung ‘Estimating non-indigenous species establishment and their impact on biodiversity, using the Relative Suitability Richness model‘ Invasive species are one of the leading causes of biodiversity loss and established invaders are nearly impossible to eradicate. Conservation efforts should therefore focus on preventing the establishment of invasive species. Managers need to be able to predict which … Continue reading Prioritizing conservation and management efforts with new methods to predict invasive species occurrence and impact

Why hirola are the world’s most endangered antelope, and what it will take to save them – with Somali translation

In this post Jacob Goheen and Abdullahi Ali discuss their recent paper ‘Resource selection and landscape change reveal mechanisms suppressing population recovery for the world’s most endangered antelope‘. Ali has also provided a Somali translation of this post. Journal of Applied Ecology is dedicated to making papers more accessible and increasing engagement with those in the region of the study. We encourage authors to write … Continue reading Why hirola are the world’s most endangered antelope, and what it will take to save them – with Somali translation

Invasive wild pigs making themselves at home throughout the USA

In this post Nathan Snow discusses his recent paper ‘Interpreting and predicting the spread of invasive wild pigs‘ The eruption of invasive wild pigs Sus scrofa throughout the world exemplifies the need to understand the influences of exotic and non-native species expansions. In particular, the continental USA is precariously threatened by a rapid expansion of these wild pigs, and a better understanding of the rate … Continue reading Invasive wild pigs making themselves at home throughout the USA

Tracking an apex marine predator – the shortfin mako shark

In this post Jeremy Vaudo and Mahmood Shivji discuss their article ‘Long-term satellite tracking reveals region-specific movements of a large pelagic predator, the shortfin mako shark, in the western North Atlantic Ocean’ In your paper you used satellite telemetry to investigate movements and seasonal distributions of shortfin mako sharks (Isurus oxyrinchus) in the western North Atlantic Ocean. What were the biggest challenges for this work? … Continue reading Tracking an apex marine predator – the shortfin mako shark