One year on: a Q&A with 2015 Southwood Prize winner Dustin Ranglack

Today sees the announcement of this year’s winners of the BES Early Career Researcher Awards. Journal of Applied Ecology awards the Southwood Prize each year to the best paper in the Journal by an early career author at the start of their career. Dustin Ranglack won last year’s Southwood Prize for his paper ‘Competition on the range: science vs. perception in a bison–cattle conflict in … Continue reading One year on: a Q&A with 2015 Southwood Prize winner Dustin Ranglack

Finding missing branches: Phylogenetic patterns of plant community diversity in restored and remnant tallgrass prairies

To round off our series of posts from the Special Feature, Toward prediction in the restoration of biodiversity, we’re sharing Rebecca Barak’s post from earlier this year on her article Restored tallgrass prairies have reduced phylogenetic diversity compared with remnants.  Tallgrass prairie is one of the most endangered habitats on earth. In my home state of Illinois, USA, back in 1820, almost 60% of the state was … Continue reading Finding missing branches: Phylogenetic patterns of plant community diversity in restored and remnant tallgrass prairies

Uncertainty matters in modelling, but it can be overcome if some simple rules are followed

In this post Associate Editor Andre Punt discusses a recent Commentary from E. J. Milner-Gulland and Katriona Shea ‘Embracing uncertainty in applied ecology‘ Models are core to many working in the various fields that constitute applied ecology. However, models can mislead researchers and decision makers if used incorrectly.  Uncertainty is pervasive in applied ecology, and if not handled correctly can lead those using models having … Continue reading Uncertainty matters in modelling, but it can be overcome if some simple rules are followed

Editor’s Choice 54:2 – Optimizing the use of species distribution maps for planning new protected areas

The Editor’s Choice for Issue 54:2 is written by Kulbhushansingh Suryawanshi, who is taking part in our Associate Editor mentoring opportunity. The article chosen by the Editors as this issue’s Editor’s choice article is ‘Limitations and trade-offs in the use of species distribution maps for protected area planning‘ by Moreno Di Marco and colleagues. Protected Areas have been the ‘big idea’ of biodiversity conservation over … Continue reading Editor’s Choice 54:2 – Optimizing the use of species distribution maps for planning new protected areas

Measuring dark diversity: what do we know and where do we go from here?

In this post Chris Wilson (The Flory Lab) discusses a recent article from Jesper Moeslund and colleagues ‘Using dark diversity and plant characteristics to guide conservation and restoration‘ Central to ecology and conservation biology is the quest to understand and, more importantly, conserve biodiversity. However, generally you can’t manage what you can’t measure, and you can’t measure what you can’t define! Biodiversity is traditionally defined … Continue reading Measuring dark diversity: what do we know and where do we go from here?

International Women’s Day 2017: advice for aspiring ecologists

For the last of our series of blog posts for International Women’s Day our Associate Editors give their advice for female students or early career researchers looking to make a career in ecology. Nathalie Butt – Unfortunately, it is still very much the case that it is not what you know, but who you know, so be strategic with who you work with/where you work. … Continue reading International Women’s Day 2017: advice for aspiring ecologists

International Women’s Day 2017: improvements towards gender equality in science

In the third of our posts in our series of blog posts for International Women’s Day we asked our Associate Editors about improvements they are seeing towards gender equality, new initiatives and any institution, department or person who deserves specific praise in this area. Nathalie Butt – I have seen big increases in awareness of, and talk about, gender equality issues in recent years, and … Continue reading International Women’s Day 2017: improvements towards gender equality in science

International Women’s Day 2017: barriers to entering science

Continuing our series of blog posts for International Women’s Day, our Associate Editors discuss barriers to women entering STEM fields and what we need to do to improve gender equality. Nathalie Butt – In terms of barriers to women, there are some fairly subtle ones, such as the general feeling that it is better to travel widely (e.g. degree in one place, PhD in another, … Continue reading International Women’s Day 2017: barriers to entering science

International Women’s Day 2017: pursuing a career in science

Wednesday 8 March 2017 is International Women’s Day, a global day to celebrate the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women. The theme for this year’s International Women’s Day is #BeBoldForChange. This recognises the need to challenge bias and inequality, celebrate women’s achievements, champion women’s education and more. From encouraging more girls into STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) education and careers to showcasing … Continue reading International Women’s Day 2017: pursuing a career in science

Optimally controlling invasive species in spatially-connected networks

In this post Sam Nicol discusses his recent article with Regis Sabbadin, Nathalie Peyrard and Iadine Chadès ‘Finding the best management policy to eradicate invasive species from spatial ecological networks with simultaneous actions‘ Lots of invasive species live in spatial networks, which means that they live in a series of discrete habitat sites, but occasionally move between the sites. Managing invasive species in these networks … Continue reading Optimally controlling invasive species in spatially-connected networks