Finding missing branches: Phylogenetic patterns of plant community diversity in restored and remnant tallgrass prairies

Originally posted on The Applied Ecologist:
To round off our series of posts from the Special Feature, Toward prediction in the restoration of biodiversity, we’re sharing Rebecca Barak’s post from earlier this year on her article Restored tallgrass prairies have reduced phylogenetic diversity compared with remnants.  Tallgrass prairie is one of the most endangered habitats on earth. In my home state of Illinois, USA, back in 1820,… Continue reading Finding missing branches: Phylogenetic patterns of plant community diversity in restored and remnant tallgrass prairies

Landscape structure and human management influence biodiversity value of livestock production systems

In this post Associate Editor, Elizabeth Nichols  and student, Jordan Reyes comment on the recent paper by Alvarado et al.,The role of livestock intensification and landscape structure in maintaining tropical biodiversity, published in Journal of Applied Ecology. The United Nations predicts that by the year 2050 the world population will have increased by 34%, reaching nearly 9.7 billion people. How can we support this growing human … Continue reading Landscape structure and human management influence biodiversity value of livestock production systems

Tree islands for tropical forest restoration: the outlook is rosy after 10 years

Source: Tree islands for tropical forest restoration: the outlook is rosy after 10 years Shared from Natural history of Ecological Restoration, Leighton Reid comments on his article, Local tropical forest restoration strategies affect tree recruitment more strongly than does landscape forest cover. The article was recently published as part of the Toward prediction in the restoration of biodiversity Special Feature in Journal of Applied Ecology. Planting tree … Continue reading Tree islands for tropical forest restoration: the outlook is rosy after 10 years

Poaching problems? More rangers, please…

Sharing his insights into on-the-ground conservation, Maarten Hofman (University of Goettingen, Germany & Bangor University, UK) discusses Moore et al.’s recent article, Are ranger patrols effective in reducing poaching-related threats within protected areas, and the wider implications for tackling illegal poaching. Rangers are the heavy duty machinery in every protected area management’s human resource arsenal. Their list of duties ranges from public outreach and environmental … Continue reading Poaching problems? More rangers, please…

Variation in soil microbial communities leads to variation in plant communities

In the latest in our series of blogs for the Toward prediction in the restoration of biodiveristy Special Feature, Jonathan Bauer discusses his article, Effects of between-site variation in soil microbial communities and plant-soil feedbacks on the productivity and composition of plant communities. All articles from the Special Feature are available in issue 54.4 of Journal of Applied Ecology. Microorganisms in the soil have strong effects on plant … Continue reading Variation in soil microbial communities leads to variation in plant communities

Video: Population density – a new method using remote cameras and radio collars

In this latest post, Jesse Whittington shares insights into new models for monitoring wildlife, including grizzly bears. Don’t forget to watch the video of some bears captured on camera! Whittington and colleagues’ Open Access article, Generalized spatial mark–resight models with an application to grizzly bears is available in the Journal of Applied Ecology. Wildlife managers around the world strive to estimate population abundance and the related … Continue reading Video: Population density – a new method using remote cameras and radio collars

Resilience: advancing a deceptively simple concept

The latest in our series of blogs to accompany the Special Feature, Toward prediction in the restoration of biodiveristy, is written by Loralee Larios. Loralee’s article, Where and how to restore in a changing world: a demographic-based assessment of resilience, is published in the Journal of Applied Ecology. The unprecedented rates at which natural systems have been altered have prompted a parallel increase in restoration efforts to … Continue reading Resilience: advancing a deceptively simple concept

Effective management options for exotic fish species: round goby case study – with Portuguese translation

In this post, Marina Lopes Bueno, PhD Student in Applied Ecology at the University of Lavras, Brazil, discusses the recent  Journal of Applied Ecology article, A dynamical model for invasive round goby populations reveals efficient and effective management options by N’Guyen and colleagues. Marina has also included a Portuguese translation of this post. Journal of Applied Ecology is dedicated to making papers more accessible and increasing engagement with … Continue reading Effective management options for exotic fish species: round goby case study – with Portuguese translation

A common currency for connecting the goals of restoration: plant traits can help us understand how plant communities form and help ecosystems function

For the latest post in our Toward prediction in the restoration of biodiversity series, Chad Zirbel turns to tallgrass prairies to examine the role of plant traits in predicting restoration outcomes. Chad and colleagues’ paper, Plant functional traits and environmental conditions shape community assembly and ecosystem functioning during restoration, is available in the Journal of Applied Ecology. Two of the major goals of restoration are … Continue reading A common currency for connecting the goals of restoration: plant traits can help us understand how plant communities form and help ecosystems function

What happens to honeybees and beekeepers when farmlands lack flowers?

In this post Fabrice Requier discusses his recent article, The carry-over effects of pollen shortage decrease the survival of honeybee colonies in farmlands, available in issue 54:4 of the Journal of Applied Ecology. Over the past 50 years, landscapes have been profoundly modified to meet growing food requirements. Current human-dominated landscapes result in a loss of habitats and associated biodiversity. These often-simplified landscapes limit the … Continue reading What happens to honeybees and beekeepers when farmlands lack flowers?