Microclimate determines transplantation success

Associate Editor, Pieter De Frenne (Ghent University, Belgium) discusses assisted migration, climate change and the recent article by Brooker et al. Tiny niches and translocations: the challenge of identifying suitable recipient sites for small and immobile species. One of the key outstanding issues in applied ecology is to better inform land managers and policy makers how to adapt to climate change. Many species are currently shifting their … Continue reading Microclimate determines transplantation success

Jaguar habitat use outside protected areas in Central America: accounting for the detection process generates new insights

We’re turning our attention to wide-ranging animals, specifically jaguars of Central America. Lisanne Petracca discusses her recent article, Robust inference on large-scale species habitat use with interview data: The status of jaguars outside protected areas in Central America. The team also share video summaries of their work in English and Spanish.  For wide-ranging animals such as our focal species, the jaguar (Panthera onca), it is … Continue reading Jaguar habitat use outside protected areas in Central America: accounting for the detection process generates new insights

The human influences shaping peatland vegetation communities

This blog by Alice Noble discusses peatland protection policy and follows her recent article in Journal of Applied Ecology, Prescribed burning, atmospheric pollution and grazing effects on peatland vegetation composition. As sloping expanses of shrubs, sedges and moss where the only sounds are wind, rain and birds, with no people in sight, blanket peatlands can feel like wild and remote places. In the UK, these upland … Continue reading The human influences shaping peatland vegetation communities

The only way is up: reptiles in trees resist the impacts of cattle grazing

With Reptile Awareness Day coming up, Heather Neilly comments on the effects of cattle grazing and her recent article, Arboreality increases reptile community resistance to disturbance from livestock grazing. Grazing by domestic livestock occurs on 25% of Earth’s land surface. With such vast landscapes being used, it is important to understand how this land use affects the native wildlife in these areas. We know that … Continue reading The only way is up: reptiles in trees resist the impacts of cattle grazing

Strawberry fields forever – with Spanish translation

In this post, Associate Editor, Cristina Garcia comments on the effects of pesticides on pollinators and the recent article by Horth & Campbell, Supplementing small farms with native mason bees increases strawberry size and growth rate. Cristina has also provided a Spanish translation of this post. Most plant species, including crops, require mutualistic interactions with animals to pollinate their flowers and fulfill their demographic cycle. The … Continue reading Strawberry fields forever – with Spanish translation

How did the squirrel glider’s genes cross the road? Wildlife crossing structures are no joke

Punchlines aside, in this blog Kylie Soanes shares insights from her recent article, Evaluating the success of wildlife crossing structures using genetic approaches and an experimental design: Lessons from a gliding mammal. Wildlife crossing structures are a common answer to the age-old question: ‘How did the animal cross the road?’ Tunnels and bridges for wildlife are being built and used by animals all over the world, … Continue reading How did the squirrel glider’s genes cross the road? Wildlife crossing structures are no joke

Forest loss impacts fish diversity in the Amazon floodplain

Today’s post discusses the wider impacts of forest loss and comes from the team behind the recent article, Relationships between forest cover and fish diversity in the Amazon River floodplain. In the Amazon and most other major tropical regions, large forested areas are being cleared for development of agriculture, hydropower and human settlements. Floodplain forests provide key habitats and food resources for fish, including several … Continue reading Forest loss impacts fish diversity in the Amazon floodplain

Tracking restoration of population diversity via the portfolio effect

In this week’s blog, Associate Editor, Andre Punt comments on the recent paper by Yamane et al. Tracking restoration of population diversity via the portfolio effect. Many fisheries are managed to avoid populations dropping below threshold levels, and closing them to harvest when this happens. The implications of closures can be substantial for those who gain commercial or recreational benefits from harvest, as well as … Continue reading Tracking restoration of population diversity via the portfolio effect