Integrating fire management policies within conservation planning: ‘win-win’ solutions for bird conservation and wildfire prevention

Adrián Regos and colleagues highlight how their conservation planning objectives can lead to ‘win-win’ situations for bird conservation and wildfire prevention in fire-prone abandoned landscapes. This follows the recent publication of their article, Trade‐offs and synergies between bird conservation and wildfire suppression in the face of global change. Protected areas play a key role in safeguarding biodiversity worldwide. However, their role can be seriously compromised … Continue reading Integrating fire management policies within conservation planning: ‘win-win’ solutions for bird conservation and wildfire prevention

La integración de las políticas de gestión de incendios forestales en la planificación de la conservación puede proporcionar soluciones beneficiosas tanto para la conservación de las aves como la prevención de incendios

En el siguiente articulo, Trade‐offs and synergies between bird conservation and wildfire suppression in the face of global change, Adrián Regos y coautores muestran como la integración de las dinámicas fuego-vegetación, las políticas de incendios forestales y sus objetivos en la planificación de la conservación puede conducir a situaciones beneficiosas tanto en términos de conservación de la avifauna como de prevención de incendios en paisaje … Continue reading La integración de las políticas de gestión de incendios forestales en la planificación de la conservación puede proporcionar soluciones beneficiosas tanto para la conservación de las aves como la prevención de incendios

Ostrom’s framework: where people and nature meet

Presenting a framework to evaluate the sustainability of different social-ecological systems: Associate Editor, Cristina Garcia discusses the recently published paper, Quantifying ecological and social drivers of ecological surprise by Filbee‐Dexter et al. Conservation Biology has operated under different paradigms since the 1960s, when the preservation of pristine natural ecosystems and species was the frontmost goal under the ‘nature itself‘ paradigm. More recently, conservation biologists have recognized the ‘people … Continue reading Ostrom’s framework: where people and nature meet

Defining and delivering resilient ecological networks in England

Nick Isaac et al.’s new Policy Direction, Defining and delivering resilient ecological networks: nature conservation in England is available as an Accepted Article from today (Thursday 21st June). Read Nick’s comments on the development of this adaptive management framework in this post and watch a video here. The UK Government’s 25 Year Environment Plan (henceforth 25YEP) for England is an exciting opportunity to reframe the direction of nature conservation … Continue reading Defining and delivering resilient ecological networks in England

Bumblebees are frequent flyers – what are the impacts?

Addressing pollinator introduction policy and the effects introduced species can have on local ecosystems, Romina Rader, Manu Saunders and Tobias Smith discuss the recent Policy Direction, Coordinated species importation policies are needed to reduce serious invasions globally: The case of alien bumblebees in South America by Aizen et al. Bumblebees (Bombus spp.) are large, iconic pollinators of many wild flowers and crops.  Their ability to … Continue reading Bumblebees are frequent flyers – what are the impacts?

Crop rotations called into question

Why it’s time to rethink the way we approach this agricultural practice: Mathias Cougnon & Associate Editor, Pieter De Frenne (Ghent University, Belgium) discuss the recent paper, Distantly related crops are not better rotation partners for tomato by by Ingerslew and Kaplan. Crop rotations are central to common agricultural practice and growing related crops year after year on the same patch of land is generally … Continue reading Crop rotations called into question

Editor’s Choice 55:4 – Applying ecology to inform plant disease management policy and avoid regulator-grower conflict

The Editor’s Choice for issue 55:4 is written by Senior Editor, Phil Stephens. The selected article is Grower and regulator conflict in management of the citrus disease Huanglongbing in Brazil: A modelling study by Craig et al. Plant disease is already recognised as a major driver of crop yield losses. With a huge proportion of the growing human population’s food intake dependent on a relatively … Continue reading Editor’s Choice 55:4 – Applying ecology to inform plant disease management policy and avoid regulator-grower conflict

Modelling the long-term recovery of deep-sea corals following a spill: optimising monitoring and management strategies

This World Oceans Day, we’re diving into the deep sea and coral recovery. Fanny Girard discusses the recent article, Projecting the recovery of a long‐lived deep‐sea coral species after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill using state‐structured models. Although the deep sea is the largest ecosystem on earth, it is also the least understood due to its inaccessibility. Advances in technology in the last few decades … Continue reading Modelling the long-term recovery of deep-sea corals following a spill: optimising monitoring and management strategies

Solutions science – Ciencia de soluciones

Claire Wordley (Conservation Evidence project, University of Cambridge) looks at evaluation and evidence in testing interventions and asks the question, ‘What works in conservation’? A Spanish version  of this post is also available. Evidence in conservation: does it matter? What do scaring juvenile offenders, giving steroids to head trauma patients, and bat bridges all have in common? They are all examples of interventions that were … Continue reading Solutions science – Ciencia de soluciones