Using tracking data to guide research and conservation efforts in long-distance migratory birds

Developments in tracking data are uncovering important conservation sites, the significance of which had previously been unknown. Associate Editor, Chi-Yeung explains more about the recently published work of Ying‐Chi Chan and colleagues. An increasing number of tracking studies on animals over the last few decades have revealed interesting behaviour and habits that are otherwise impossible to observe in the field. This is particularly the case … Continue reading Using tracking data to guide research and conservation efforts in long-distance migratory birds

Senior Editor vacancy – apply now

We are seeking an ecologist who is highly motivated in advancing the publication of applied ecological research to join the team of Editors on Journal of Applied Ecology. Deadline 05 September 2019. We are seeking an ecologist to join the current editorial team, collaborating with the other Editors to continue raising the Journal of Applied Ecology‘s profile and reach worldwide. The journal’s international Editorial Board consists of … Continue reading Senior Editor vacancy – apply now

The context dependencies of how spillover from remnant grasslands enhances plant diversity in restorations

New research from Sperry et al. provides insights into prairie restoration practice. Associate Editor, Lars Brudvig explains more. Grasslands, including North American prairies, are widely restored through seed sowing onto abandoned agricultural lands. This approach to restoration holds great promise for promoting grassland biodiversity, yet restored prairies typically harbor fewer plant species than remnants without a history of agriculture, and plant diversity tends to decline … Continue reading The context dependencies of how spillover from remnant grasslands enhances plant diversity in restorations

Conservation optimism: applied ecologists lead the way

Linking to their upcoming summit in Oxford, UK, Conservation Optimism’s E.J. Milner-Gulland brings together a selection of recent research papers that celebrate conservation success and look for solutions. These are both difficult and hopeful times for applied ecologists. On the one hand, the scale and severity of the strain that our ecological systems are under is becoming more and more apparent; a look through the … Continue reading Conservation optimism: applied ecologists lead the way

Voting time! What would you like to see on the blog?

Complete our poll or leave a comment and let us know the types of content you’re interested in. We’re pleased to share a variety of different types of posts with you, from summaries of new research to event reports and community posts. But, as we continue to develop The Applied Ecologist’s Blog, we want to make sure the content we share suits your needs and … Continue reading Voting time! What would you like to see on the blog?

Identifying fishery risk zones for seabird populations

Part of our Spotlight, Management of wide-ranging species, Thomas A. Clay explains how advances in remote tracking technology are offering us a glimpse into the mysterious life of the albatross in the hope of developing conservation measures to protect seabirds from bycatch risks. The authors have adapted this post from an article they previously shared with BirdLife International. Albatrosses are iconic voyagers, well known for … Continue reading Identifying fishery risk zones for seabird populations

Protecting pollinators through better road verge management

In their recent study, Ben Phillips and colleagues reveal the importance of road verges as habitats for pollinators, as well as the negative impacts of current management actions. But how can we improve the situation? Most of us spend a good part of our days travelling on roads. The remains of the animals that stare back at us from the asphalt – the victims of … Continue reading Protecting pollinators through better road verge management

Cover stories: recovering beauty

Our August cover image by Guiyao Zhou (East China Normal University) shows how livestock grazing activities potentially alter many ecosystem functions such as carbon sequestration. But these effects can be markedly regulated by the associated global change factors (e.g., warming, nitrogen addition and drought). Here Guiyao shares the story behind the cover image and the grassland ecosystem work it represents.  These photos were taken in Wayan mountain, a very beautiful alpine meadow … Continue reading Cover stories: recovering beauty

Spotlight: management of wide-ranging species

In issue 56:8 we showcase the research, technology and mitigation efforts going into the management of wide-ranging species today. Join Associate Editor, Johan du Toit in exploring this selection of work, free to read in the journal for a limited time. The ability to range widely across our planet conveys a game-changing advantage to certain animals, as was realised by humans when they discovered that … Continue reading Spotlight: management of wide-ranging species

Editor’s Choice 56:8 – could periodic fisheries closures become a more mainstream tool in the future?

Associate Editor, Hedley Grantham discusses our August Editor’s Choice article, Optimized fishing through periodically harvested closures by Carvalho et al. Fisheries management, and sustainable marine management more broadly, require an assembly of management strategies to be effective. Two primary fisheries management tools are catch and effort restrictions, which are often not very spatially-specific. In contrast, spatially-explicit permanent fishing closures like no-take marine reserves are an … Continue reading Editor’s Choice 56:8 – could periodic fisheries closures become a more mainstream tool in the future?