Cover stories: Indigenous and local knowledge

Journal of Applied Ecology’s September 2020 cover highlights an international Malagasy-Finnish project trying to reforest some of the damaged Malagasy forests. In the photo, a project worker shows a shoot that will be planted in one of the areas under reforestation process. Here photographer, Joan de la Malla shares some more of her work and tells the story behind the photos. The corresponding research contributes … Continue reading Cover stories: Indigenous and local knowledge

How can we improve tree planting outcomes?

With a growing number of tree planting initiatives at regional to global scales, Karen Holl and Pedro Brancalion highlight in their latest research how planting trees is much more complicated than it seems. Here they share their findings, including guidelines to increase success of these ambitious efforts world-wide. Planting trees is so satisfying. You dig a hole, put a tree seedling in the ground, fill … Continue reading How can we improve tree planting outcomes?

Forests undergoing novel disturbances: understanding and managing the complex new reality of forests

Considering the vast impacts disturbances such as fire and insect outbreaks are having on forests worldwide, Alexandro B. Leverkus and Simon Thorn bring together a selection of work showcasing quality research into these disturbances and strategies being taken to manage them.

This Virtual Issue features articles from across the British Ecological Society journals that are free-to-read for a limited time. Continue reading Forests undergoing novel disturbances: understanding and managing the complex new reality of forests

Black and white fragmentation maps can be misleading

Recent research from Marina Antongionanni and colleagues estimates 47,000 fragments of Caatinga dry forests to be affected by chronic human disturbances. Here the authors look at how such effects are depicted, and demonstrate how this knowledge can help define large-scale conservation and management actions. Continue reading Black and white fragmentation maps can be misleading

Do we really need to plant a trillion trees? Tree islands are an ecologically and economically sound strategy for tropical forest recovery

In their new research, Karen Holl, Leighton Reid and colleagues compare the use of tree islands to other strategies for tropical forest restoration. Here they share their findings, including ecological and economic benefits, as well as lessons to carry forward. A video summary of the research is also available in English and Spanish. A version of this blog was originally shared by Natural History of … Continue reading Do we really need to plant a trillion trees? Tree islands are an ecologically and economically sound strategy for tropical forest recovery

Green-tree retention benefits recovery of ground beetles

In their new research, Linhao Wu and colleagues set out to answer the question ‘how do retention harvest and forest type together affect the conservation and recovery of ground beetles assemblages’?  Ground beetles (members of the family Carabidae) are common and important components of forest biodiversity. Because they are easy to collect, highly diverse and sensitive to habitat changes, they have been widely used as … Continue reading Green-tree retention benefits recovery of ground beetles

Improving soil fertility in cocoa agroforests using the most suitable shade tree species

Can leaf quality explain the influence of shade tree species on the fertility of cocoa farms? Marie Sauvadet and colleagues summarise their recent research. Cocoa, a major commodity worldwide, is largely produced by smallholder farms in developing countries. With limited access to synthetic fertilisers and pesticides, smallhold farmers traditionally lean on cocoa ecology to ensure their harvest thorough the years. Cocoa naturally grows under the … Continue reading Improving soil fertility in cocoa agroforests using the most suitable shade tree species

Spotlight: new insights into forest management

What are some surprising new approaches to restoration in forest landscapes? What are the ecosystem services provided by deer? Can we use salvage logging to prevent future bark beetle outbreaks? These questions and more are answered in our new Spotlight collection, sharing new insights and innovations in forest management. Associate Editor, Julio Louzada brings together the featured articles. The modern tradeoff between the maintenance of … Continue reading Spotlight: new insights into forest management

A novel view of salvage logging in Europe’s spruce forests

In their recently published research, Laura Dobor, Tomáš Hlásny and colleagues investigate how different levels of intensity in salvage logging affect both bark beetle outbreaks and  landscape-scale carbon storage. Salvage logging – the removal of trees killed by wind, insects and other agents – is one of the most frequently applied management responses to forest disturbances worldwide. In European Norway spruce forests, salvaging of windfelled … Continue reading A novel view of salvage logging in Europe’s spruce forests

Exotic eucalypts in restoration? It can work

Achieving ambitious, yet cost-effective, global forest restoration goals requires creative approaches. Nino T. Amazonas, Pedro H. S. Brancalion & Karen D. Holl present a novel strategy from Brazil, using mixed plantations of exotic eucalypts and native tree species as a transitional stage for tropical forest restoration. Many countries worldwide have committed large portions of their territory to forest landscape restoration, which has been widely advertised … Continue reading Exotic eucalypts in restoration? It can work