Introducing The Applied Ecologist … your new-look blog

The Applied Ecologist’s Blog has a new look and, with it, a new name! We’re pleased to introduce The Applied Ecologist. Bridging the gap between researchers, practitioners and policymakers, this is your home for applied ecological content from the British Ecological Society. We’ll still be sharing research news from Journal of Applied Ecology as well as topical contributions from our global community of practitioners, researchers … Continue reading Introducing The Applied Ecologist … your new-look blog

New-look blog coming soon …

We are excited to introduce a brand new and refreshed look to this applied ecology blog, coming next week (after 12 May 2020). The new-look blog will continue to share research news from Journal of Applied Ecology as well as topical contributions from our global community of practitioners, researchers and policymakers. But it will also welcome contributions based on work published in new journal, Ecological … Continue reading New-look blog coming soon …

Protecting pollinators through better road verge management

In their recent study, Ben Phillips and colleagues reveal the importance of road verges as habitats for pollinators, as well as the negative impacts of current management actions. But how can we improve the situation? Most of us spend a good part of our days travelling on roads. The remains of the animals that stare back at us from the asphalt – the victims of … Continue reading Protecting pollinators through better road verge management

BES journal blogs round up: February 2019

February was another busy month across the British Ecological Society blogs. We’ve seen the launch of Special Features on ecological succession and advances in modelling demographic processes, as well as a cross-journal series on rewilding, a look at the physics behind predator and prey size ratios and an exploration of how climate change is affecting penguin interactions. Read on for more highlights. Functional Ecologists – … Continue reading BES journal blogs round up: February 2019

BES journal blog roundup: January 2019

It’s already been a busy 2019 for the six British Ecological Society journal blogs. We’ve covered topics from leaving the nest, to sustainable food production, to stress in academia, to climate change. On Relational Thinking we learned that cats can’t trespass. And Animal Ecology in Focus taught us that some crabs steal food from plants. Head over to the Methods Blog to look back at … Continue reading BES journal blog roundup: January 2019

Early career ecologists look to plot a safe course through the Brexit minefield

In the face of continuing uncertainty over Brexit and UK environmental policy, Andy Suggitt  from the British Ecological Society’s Conservation Ecology Group argues that now is the time for early career ecologists to engage and get involved in the process. We’ve all had that feeling about Brexit. It’s top of the newsfeed on our favourite social media site, it’s the first item on the evening … Continue reading Early career ecologists look to plot a safe course through the Brexit minefield

Speed Review at the BES Annual Meeting: Get a Senior Editor’s Opinion on YOUR Manuscript

Originally posted on Methods.blog: Speed Review at the BES Annual Meeting: Get a Senior Editor’s Opinion on YOUR Manuscript Coming to the British Ecological Society Annual Meeting? Planning to submit a paper to a BES journal? Then you should sign up for the Speed Review Session on Monday 17 December (sign-up sheets will be on the BES Stand in the Exhibition Hall)! Find out more about … Continue reading Speed Review at the BES Annual Meeting: Get a Senior Editor’s Opinion on YOUR Manuscript

Issue 55:6

Here are some of the highlights from our last issue of 2018 and our last issue to be published in print. You can also read issue 55:6 online here. Disentangling natural vs anthropogenic influences on predation: reducing impacts on sensitive prey Our latest Editor’s Choice article Cover stories: Cheetah chase Take a look at this selection of images telling the story behind our latest cover … Continue reading Issue 55:6

Reblog: Fishing forecasts can predict marine creature movements

Originally posted by The Conversation. Heather Welch, University of California, Santa Cruz; Elliott Lee Hazen, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and Stephanie Brodie, University of California, Santa Cruz Do you check the weather forecast before getting dressed in the morning? If you do, then you’re making a decision in real time, based on dynamic processes that can vary greatly over space and time. Marine animals … Continue reading Reblog: Fishing forecasts can predict marine creature movements

Issue 55:5

Read the highlights from our September issue. Value of information: when to learn and when to manage in conservation This issue’s Editor’s Choice article Better many small than a few large: how landscape configuration affects arthropod communities in rice Can splitting agricultural ecosystems help reduce yield losses for rice farmers? Mejor muchos pequeños que pocos grandes: sobre como la configuración del paisaje afecta las comunidades … Continue reading Issue 55:5