Editor’s Choice 57:05 – Long-lasting effects of land use on soil microbial restoration

How might previous land uses still affect restoration efforts today? Associate Editor, Gaowen Yang explores our latest Editor’s Choice research by Nash E. Turley and colleagues.   Agricultural abandonment can result in many environmental benefits, such as reduction in soil loss, increase in soil nutrient, biodiversity conservation. However, agricultural history has long-lasting effects (also called land-use legacies) on ecosystem recovery. For instance, when compared with … Continue reading Editor’s Choice 57:05 – Long-lasting effects of land use on soil microbial restoration

Exotic eucalypts in restoration? It can work

Achieving ambitious, yet cost-effective, global forest restoration goals requires creative approaches. Nino T. Amazonas, Pedro H. S. Brancalion & Karen D. Holl present a novel strategy from Brazil, using mixed plantations of exotic eucalypts and native tree species as a transitional stage for tropical forest restoration. Many countries worldwide have committed large portions of their territory to forest landscape restoration, which has been widely advertised … Continue reading Exotic eucalypts in restoration? It can work

How to reduce the financial risks associated with restoration efforts?

High variation in biodiversity recovery in restored forests at landscape scale can increase the risk associated with investments in restoration programmes. Crouzeilles  et al. summarise their new approach, which aims to predict and map landscape variation in forest restoration success and thus reduce the unpredictability associated with financial risk. Investors operating in different businesses usually avoid high-risk transactions, which likely constrains the flow of financial resources … Continue reading How to reduce the financial risks associated with restoration efforts?

The context dependencies of how spillover from remnant grasslands enhances plant diversity in restorations

New research from Sperry et al. provides insights into prairie restoration practice. Associate Editor, Lars Brudvig explains more. Grasslands, including North American prairies, are widely restored through seed sowing onto abandoned agricultural lands. This approach to restoration holds great promise for promoting grassland biodiversity, yet restored prairies typically harbor fewer plant species than remnants without a history of agriculture, and plant diversity tends to decline … Continue reading The context dependencies of how spillover from remnant grasslands enhances plant diversity in restorations

Measuring ecosystem functioning to assess river restoration success

Shortlisted for this year’s Southwood Prize early career researcher award, André Frainer talks us through his work on river restoration and habitat heterogeneity. When rivers are drained, dredged, channelised, or altered in a thousand different ways, they face an almost imminent loss of biodiversity and important ecological functions. This is often a consequence of the loss of habitat diversity and the fauna and flora that … Continue reading Measuring ecosystem functioning to assess river restoration success

A new method for predicting time to recovery during restoration

Associate Editor, Lars Brudvig looks at the recently published Review, Advancing restoration ecology: A new approach to predict time to recovery by Rydgren et al. Restoring degraded ecosystems is a global priority, hailed for its potential to recover biodiversity and promote ecosystem functioning and services. Yet successful restoration doesn’t happen overnight. It may take years, decades, or longer for restoration projects to meet their goals … Continue reading A new method for predicting time to recovery during restoration

Finding evidence for land restoration strategies

Restoration has never been more important, with almost a third of the world’s land surface degraded. But what exactly is restoration? And how do we know if it works? Madelon Lohbeck continues our Special Feature series on Functional traits in agroecology. Read the full article, Trait-based approaches for guiding the restoration of degraded agricultural landscapes in East Africa. More than 1.5 billion of the world’s poorest … Continue reading Finding evidence for land restoration strategies

Tracking restoration of population diversity via the portfolio effect

In this week’s blog, Associate Editor, Andre Punt comments on the recent paper by Yamane et al. Tracking restoration of population diversity via the portfolio effect. Many fisheries are managed to avoid populations dropping below threshold levels, and closing them to harvest when this happens. The implications of closures can be substantial for those who gain commercial or recreational benefits from harvest, as well as … Continue reading Tracking restoration of population diversity via the portfolio effect

Putting ecology theory to work: trends and opportunities in ecological restoration

Following her recently published Review, Links between community ecology theory and ecological restoration are on the rise, author Claire E. Wainright discusses taking a global perspective on restoration ecology. Community ecology and restoration ecology are often considered complementary fields. Ecologists recognize that the science of ecology provides solid conceptual foundations on which to construct hypothesis-driven restoration research. By extension, restoration offers unique opportunities to empirically … Continue reading Putting ecology theory to work: trends and opportunities in ecological restoration

Looking beyond boulders and logs in boreal stream restoration

Our new latest issue features the article, Differential responses by stream and riparian biodiversity to in-stream restoration of forestry-impacted streams by Turunen and colleagues. Here, Associate Editor, David Moreno Mateos shares his views on the challenges of stream restoration. Stream restoration is just not possible today. At least, if your plan is to just drop a bunch of rocks or logs into the creek. Turunen … Continue reading Looking beyond boulders and logs in boreal stream restoration