Remote cameras help ecologists understand community-level responses

In this post, Paul Lukacs discusses a paper he recently handled by Mathias Tobler and colleagues “Spatiotemporal hierarchical modelling of species richness and occupancy using camera trap data” Flipping through the pages (or scrolling through the links) of almost any applied ecological journal, you might begin to think that there is a remote camera placed in almost every patch of forest or on every fencepost. … Continue reading Remote cameras help ecologists understand community-level responses

Can’t see the puffins for the auks? Estimating population size with imperfect species identification

In this post, Alison Johnston (@ali__johnston) talks about her paper published today “Modelling the abundance and distribution of marine birds accounting for uncertain species identification”. Ecological surveys balance the competing goals of data quality and data quantity. We can intensively survey a small area, or cover a larger area with less detail and precision, for example in large-scale citizen science surveys. Recently there has been … Continue reading Can’t see the puffins for the auks? Estimating population size with imperfect species identification

Managing native fish with environmental flows

Flow alteration is one of the most common threats to rivers and streams around the world. Alterations such as weirs, dams and water withdrawal for human uses tend to suppress natural flow variation causing a disconnection between rivers and floodplain wetlands. These changes to the natural hydrology of rivers can have detrimental effects for fish communities because many species of fish rely on periodic access to … Continue reading Managing native fish with environmental flows