Editor’s Choice 58:8 Tree species that live slow, die older enhance tropical peat swamp restoration: Evidence from a systematic review

Associate Editor, Sharif Mukul speaks to the co-lead author of this month’s Editor’s Choice article, Stuart Smith, which presents results from a systematic review of tropical peat swamp forests reforestation projects across Southeast Asia. The restoration of degraded forested lands is a global priority, incentivised by international commitments to counteract decades of rapid deforestation. However, syntheses using seedling monitoring data from past reforestation projects remain … Continue reading Editor’s Choice 58:8 Tree species that live slow, die older enhance tropical peat swamp restoration: Evidence from a systematic review

Writefull trial announced on Journal of Applied Ecology

We are delighted to announce that we have integrated the language editing software, Writefull, into the online submission system of Journal of Applied Ecology.   Writefull is an automatic proofing and editing AI tool trained on published articles from STEM subject areas. It screens text for correctness of grammar, spelling, vocabulary and punctuation, as well more subtle language issues such as style, word order, and phrasing. … Continue reading Writefull trial announced on Journal of Applied Ecology

Jenis pohon mana yang bertahan dan tumbuh paling baik saat merestorasi hutan rawa gambut yang terdegradasi?

Posting ini juga tersedia dalam bahasa Inggris di sini Sementara kelestarian dan perlindungan hutan adalah yang terpenting, upaya yang besar sekali sedang berlangsung secara global untuk memulihkan hutan yang rusak dan hilang, terutama di daerah tropis. Dalam penelitian terbaru mereka, Smith dan rekan meninjau kelangsungan hidup dan pertumbuhan jenis pohon dalam proyek- proyek reforestasi lahan gambut tropis di seluruh Asia Tenggara. Lahan gambut tropis mencakup … Continue reading Jenis pohon mana yang bertahan dan tumbuh paling baik saat merestorasi hutan rawa gambut yang terdegradasi?

Which tree species survive and grow best when restoring a degraded peat swamp forest?

This post is also available in Indonesian here. Whilst preserving and protecting forests is crucial, tremendous efforts are on-going globally to restore degraded and lost forests, particularly in the tropics. In their latest research, Smith and colleagues review tree survival and growth in tropical peatland reforestation projects across Southeast Asia. Tropical peatlands cover a small area globally, but are dense stores of carbon. Waterlogged conditions … Continue reading Which tree species survive and grow best when restoring a degraded peat swamp forest?

The road to recovery: New research identifies priority actions for lower Fraser River salmon

In their latest research, Dr Lia Chalifour and colleagues evaluate the potential benefits of 14 management strategies – spanning fisheries, habitat, pollution, pathogens, hatcheries and predation management dimensions – on 19 genetically and ecologically distinct populations of the five Pacific salmon species in the lower Fraser River, British Columbia, Canada. Fisheries closures in British Columbia have become the norm, with ‘good years’ for returning stocks … Continue reading The road to recovery: New research identifies priority actions for lower Fraser River salmon

Editor’s Choice 59:7 The key to seabird conservation – mitigating bycatch from industrial fisheries and eradicating invasive species

Associate Editor, Maria Paniw, introduces this month’s Editor’s Choice article by Dasnon et al., which presents some good news for seabird conservation: combined efforts of avoiding bycatch from commercial fisheries and reducing impacts of invasive species can effectively boost population sizes of vulnerable marine pelagic species. Industrial fishing activities can cause substantial damage, not only to fish stocks but also to pelagic vertebrate predators that … Continue reading Editor’s Choice 59:7 The key to seabird conservation – mitigating bycatch from industrial fisheries and eradicating invasive species

Old data, new tools: Using random forest modelling to reveal multi-species habitat associations from spoor data

In their new study, Searle, Kaszta, and co-authors from Botswana, Zimbabwe, Germany, the UK, and the US discuss how machine learning can be used to disentangle multi-species habitat relationships and inform conservation planning over large areas. The importance of policy and governance in preserving wildlife areas has historically meant that conservation has been restricted to efforts within country borders. This approach is at odds with … Continue reading Old data, new tools: Using random forest modelling to reveal multi-species habitat associations from spoor data

Home is where the heat is: Thermoregulation of European bats inhabiting artificial roosts and the threat of heat waves

In their new study, Czenze and colleagues demonstrate the importance of placing bat boxes in diverse locations to provide varied roost microclimates. There are over 1400 species of bats on the planet that live in a wide variety of roosts, including caves, buildings, and trees. Many bat species are threatened by climate change and habitat destruction, and this is particularly true for forest bats. Due … Continue reading Home is where the heat is: Thermoregulation of European bats inhabiting artificial roosts and the threat of heat waves

Habitat availability alters the relative risk of a bovine tuberculosis breakdown in the aftermath of a commercial forest clearfell disturbance

In their new study, Murphy et al. discuss the relationship between human modification of landscapes and zoonotic disease emergence and spread, through their case study of bovine tuberculosis in Ireland. The interconnectedness of ecosystems is one of the most endearing facets of landscape ecology. Yet, it presents the biggest challenge for applied ecologists seeking to understand the cause and effect of ecosystem modification. Changes to … Continue reading Habitat availability alters the relative risk of a bovine tuberculosis breakdown in the aftermath of a commercial forest clearfell disturbance

Apparently stable albatross population is actually decreasing due to mouse predation

Conservation organisations struggle to directly assist all threatened species, so deciding where to spend limited resources is a common problem. In a new paper, Oppel and colleagues show that, for long-lived species, a population may decrease long before this trend becomes evident in the part of the population that can be counted. Albatrosses are among the largest flying birds in the world, and they can … Continue reading Apparently stable albatross population is actually decreasing due to mouse predation