Use of avian GPS tracking to mitigate human fatalities from bird strikes.

Air traffic has increased significantly in recent years, from 1.674 billion passengers in 2000 to 4.397 billion passengers in 2019.  However, this growth has come at a cost. In their latest research, Arrondo et al. review and quantify the characteristics of bird strikes in Spain, and analyse flight patterns of the species that caused aircraft crashes in Europe. Bird strikes have been a feature of … Continue reading Use of avian GPS tracking to mitigate human fatalities from bird strikes.

Meet the Editor: Tadeu Siqueira

We are delighted to welcome Tadeu Siqueira to the Journal of Applied Ecology Senior Editor team. Get to know the newest person behind the decision letters in this ‘Meet the Editor’ conversation. What can you tell us about the first paper you published? As an undergrad, I was interested in studying insects in streams and was introduced to a sampling technique that was cheap, easy, efficient and … Continue reading Meet the Editor: Tadeu Siqueira

Small but damaging: low-head barriers can cause selective effects on river fish communities

Artificial barriers are widespread and abundant in rivers worldwide, contributing to the global decline in freshwater biodiversity. In their latest research, Jones and colleagues aimed to assess potential selective effects of barriers on fish communities to better inform fish passage science. The impact of large barriers is well documented for large fish like salmon: disrupting well known movements between adult marine habitat and freshwater spawning/juvenile … Continue reading Small but damaging: low-head barriers can cause selective effects on river fish communities

Do roads pose a significant barrier to bee movement?

Did the bee cross the road? If not, why not – and what does this mean for the flowers on the other side? In their latest research, Fitch & Vaidya investigate the influence of roads on pollinator movement and pollination by examining patterns of pigment transfer between focal plants of two species. We know that large highways kill billions of insects each year, but whether roads … Continue reading Do roads pose a significant barrier to bee movement?

The hidden benefits of chocolate: cacao agroforests offer a conservation solution that supports biodiversity and livelihoods.

New work by Arnold and colleagues shows that sustainably grown cacao is a conservation solution which can support both people and nature, and that cacao agroforests and secondary forest can enrich regional biodiversity. Conservation initiatives have traditionally focused on protecting untouched natural areas. While this is important, we also need to understand how biodiversity can be promoted not as an alternative to human use of … Continue reading The hidden benefits of chocolate: cacao agroforests offer a conservation solution that supports biodiversity and livelihoods.

Southwood Prize 2020: early career researcher winner announced

We’re excited to announce Pu Jia as the winner of this year’s Southwood Prize, celebrating the best paper by an early career researcher in the 2020 (57th) volume of Journal of Applied Ecology. Pu’s winning paper is Plant diversity enhances the reclamation of degraded lands by stimulating plant–soil feedbacks. About the research While the ecological literature on the linkages between biodiversity and ecosystem function is rich, … Continue reading Southwood Prize 2020: early career researcher winner announced

Simple, low-cost tools can mitigate the negative impacts of climate change on incubating sea turtle clutches.

Successful incubation and production of male sea turtle hatchlings is threatened by increased global temperatures. In their latest research, Clarke and colleagues test the efficacy of two potential nest intervention approaches in reducing nest incubation temperatures in a nesting loggerhead turtle population in the Eastern Atlantic Ocean. Sea Turtles Are Vulnerable to Climate Change The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) predicts increases in global mean … Continue reading Simple, low-cost tools can mitigate the negative impacts of climate change on incubating sea turtle clutches.

Fire is a globally important driver of ecosystem composition, structure and function

In fire-prone landscapes, appropriate fire management may help bring native mammals back from the brink of extinction. In a new paper, Shaw et al. use prescribed burning to understand how small mammal populations recover after fire, so that recovery mechanisms can be incorporated into management strategies. Fire plays a pivotal role in ecosystems around the world, influencing where species are found, their abundance in the … Continue reading Fire is a globally important driver of ecosystem composition, structure and function

Do birds like African chocolate (farms)?

In their latest research, Jarrett and colleagues report the first in‐depth investigation into avian diversity and community composition in African cocoa farms, by assembling a dataset of 9,566 individual birds caught across 83 sites over 30 years in Southern Cameroon. Cocoa, the primary ingredient in all our beloved chocolate products, is grown across the tropics using a range of agricultural practices. Originating in the understory of … Continue reading Do birds like African chocolate (farms)?

Editor’s Choice 58:4 Barrier Behaviour Analysis (BaBA) reveals extensive effects of fencing on wide‐ranging ungulates

Associate Editor, Marion Valeix, introduces Journal of Applied Ecology’s April Editor’s Choice article by Wenjing Xu and colleagues, which examines the behavioural responses of two migratory ungulate species to linear barriers in Wyoming, USA. Since the dawn of civilisation, humans have used fences for protection, fortification, decoration and demarcation. The biggest and most impressive, such as the Great Wall of China, can be seen from … Continue reading Editor’s Choice 58:4 Barrier Behaviour Analysis (BaBA) reveals extensive effects of fencing on wide‐ranging ungulates