Call for proposals: Innovation in Practice

The British Ecological Society journals Ecological Solutions and Evidence and Methods in Ecology and Evolution are seeking proposals for its new cross-journal Special Feature: “Innovation in Practice“. Applied ecological management relies in part on the application of technology to help mitigate anthropogenic impacts and facilitate the recovery of populations and ecosystems. In the past few decades, new and advanced technology has been applied to solve … Continue reading Call for proposals: Innovation in Practice

Research stories: How to (almost) double woodland carbon overnight

How much carbon is stored in the aboveground biomass (AGB) of Wytham Woods aka the ‘most studied forest in the world’? Professors Mat Disney and Kim Calders thought this would be very well-known but were surprised to find this perhaps wasn’t the case after all. They discuss how their team approached their latest research. Over the years, a number of studies have estimated the carbon … Continue reading Research stories: How to (almost) double woodland carbon overnight

Research stories: Strava, GBIF and Citizen Science

Lead author Caitlin Mandeville recalls how she and her co-authors kept their focus close to home in their latest research that explores connections between citizen science and recreation in natural areas. Just about every community has some small, unassuming natural areas that are mainly known to locals: a neighbourhood park, a small wildlife preserve, a field on the edge of town. These places might not … Continue reading Research stories: Strava, GBIF and Citizen Science

Making optimal adaptive management accessible to everyone

Author Sam Nicol describes his team’s latest research developing a new model to help managers easily identify and employ adaptive management interventions to protect threatened species. Adaptive management—what’s the problem? Adaptive management has been the coolest thing in conservation for almost 40 years – everyone wants to do it. Way back in the ‘80s, the elegant seminal formulations by Hollings and Walters proposed that conservation … Continue reading Making optimal adaptive management accessible to everyone

How can we limit wind turbine impacts on biodiversity?

There are growing concerns about the impact of renewable energy development on biodiversity. In their latest research, Camille Leroux and colleagues from the National Museum of Natural History of Paris, France, explore how wind turbines impact bat spatial distribution. World-wide policies have led to a drastic increase in renewable energy developments to tackle climate emergencies, either using solar, tidal or wind energy. While these energies … Continue reading How can we limit wind turbine impacts on biodiversity?

Editor’s Choice 58:9 Identifying a pathway towards recovery for depleted wild Pacific salmon populations in a large watershed under multiple stressors

Associate Editor, Hedley Grantham, introduces this month’s Editor’s Choice article by Lia Chalifour and colleagues, which evaluates the potential benefits of 14 management strategies on 19 conservation units of the five Pacific salmon species in the lower Fraser River, British Columbia, Canada. Salmon are an iconic and globally recognisable species. In the Northeast Pacific they are also an important commercial and recreational fish species with … Continue reading Editor’s Choice 58:9 Identifying a pathway towards recovery for depleted wild Pacific salmon populations in a large watershed under multiple stressors

Machine learning has an important role to play in marine conservation

Ecological monitoring is critical for conservation efforts, yet these data often feature strong class imbalances which complicate the development of models to predict such events. In their latest research, Michael W. Wade and colleagues propose two modelling frameworks for predicting exceptionally rare aggregatory behaviour of bull and blacktip sharks along the Gulf coast of Texas. Across many industries, leaders have begun leveraging the immense potential of … Continue reading Machine learning has an important role to play in marine conservation

Mapping 35 years of prescribed fire history

Authors Erin Rowland-Schaefer and Elizabeth Bach describe their latest Data Article presenting a visual record of the long fire history of Nachusa Grasslands, a tallgrass prairie restoration site in Illinois, USA. Fire has played a significant role in the development and management of tallgrass prairie ecosystems since before European colonization. While historically, fire was used by Indigenous communities to manage the movements of bison, today, … Continue reading Mapping 35 years of prescribed fire history

The road to recovery: New research identifies priority actions for lower Fraser River salmon

In their latest research, Dr Lia Chalifour and colleagues evaluate the potential benefits of 14 management strategies – spanning fisheries, habitat, pollution, pathogens, hatcheries and predation management dimensions – on 19 genetically and ecologically distinct populations of the five Pacific salmon species in the lower Fraser River, British Columbia, Canada. Fisheries closures in British Columbia have become the norm, with ‘good years’ for returning stocks … Continue reading The road to recovery: New research identifies priority actions for lower Fraser River salmon

Old data, new tools: Using random forest modelling to reveal multi-species habitat associations from spoor data

In their new study, Searle, Kaszta, and co-authors from Botswana, Zimbabwe, Germany, the UK, and the US discuss how machine learning can be used to disentangle multi-species habitat relationships and inform conservation planning over large areas. The importance of policy and governance in preserving wildlife areas has historically meant that conservation has been restricted to efforts within country borders. This approach is at odds with … Continue reading Old data, new tools: Using random forest modelling to reveal multi-species habitat associations from spoor data