Editor’s Choice 58:9 Identifying a pathway towards recovery for depleted wild Pacific salmon populations in a large watershed under multiple stressors

Associate Editor, Hedley Grantham, introduces this month’s Editor’s Choice article by Lia Chalifour and colleagues, which evaluates the potential benefits of 14 management strategies on 19 conservation units of the five Pacific salmon species in the lower Fraser River, British Columbia, Canada. Salmon are an iconic and globally recognisable species. In the Northeast Pacific they are also an important commercial and recreational fish species with … Continue reading Editor’s Choice 58:9 Identifying a pathway towards recovery for depleted wild Pacific salmon populations in a large watershed under multiple stressors

Machine learning has an important role to play in marine conservation

Ecological monitoring is critical for conservation efforts, yet these data often feature strong class imbalances which complicate the development of models to predict such events. In their latest research, Michael W. Wade and colleagues propose two modelling frameworks for predicting exceptionally rare aggregatory behaviour of bull and blacktip sharks along the Gulf coast of Texas. Across many industries, leaders have begun leveraging the immense potential of … Continue reading Machine learning has an important role to play in marine conservation

Mapping 35 years of prescribed fire history

Authors Erin Rowland-Schaefer and Elizabeth Bach describe their latest Data Article presenting a visual record of the long fire history of Nachusa Grasslands, a tallgrass prairie restoration site in Illinois, USA. Fire has played a significant role in the development and management of tallgrass prairie ecosystems since before European colonization. While historically, fire was used by Indigenous communities to manage the movements of bison, today, … Continue reading Mapping 35 years of prescribed fire history

The road to recovery: New research identifies priority actions for lower Fraser River salmon

In their latest research, Dr Lia Chalifour and colleagues evaluate the potential benefits of 14 management strategies – spanning fisheries, habitat, pollution, pathogens, hatcheries and predation management dimensions – on 19 genetically and ecologically distinct populations of the five Pacific salmon species in the lower Fraser River, British Columbia, Canada. Fisheries closures in British Columbia have become the norm, with ‘good years’ for returning stocks … Continue reading The road to recovery: New research identifies priority actions for lower Fraser River salmon

Old data, new tools: Using random forest modelling to reveal multi-species habitat associations from spoor data

In their new study, Searle, Kaszta, and co-authors from Botswana, Zimbabwe, Germany, the UK, and the US discuss how machine learning can be used to disentangle multi-species habitat relationships and inform conservation planning over large areas. The importance of policy and governance in preserving wildlife areas has historically meant that conservation has been restricted to efforts within country borders. This approach is at odds with … Continue reading Old data, new tools: Using random forest modelling to reveal multi-species habitat associations from spoor data

Home is where the heat is: Thermoregulation of European bats inhabiting artificial roosts and the threat of heat waves

In their new study, Czenze and colleagues demonstrate the importance of placing bat boxes in diverse locations to provide varied roost microclimates. There are over 1400 species of bats on the planet that live in a wide variety of roosts, including caves, buildings, and trees. Many bat species are threatened by climate change and habitat destruction, and this is particularly true for forest bats. Due … Continue reading Home is where the heat is: Thermoregulation of European bats inhabiting artificial roosts and the threat of heat waves

Apparently stable albatross population is actually decreasing due to mouse predation

Conservation organisations struggle to directly assist all threatened species, so deciding where to spend limited resources is a common problem. In a new paper, Oppel and colleagues show that, for long-lived species, a population may decrease long before this trend becomes evident in the part of the population that can be counted. Albatrosses are among the largest flying birds in the world, and they can … Continue reading Apparently stable albatross population is actually decreasing due to mouse predation

A quantitative feasibility assessment for translocating highly mobile, endangered species

Using long-term data, IPMs, & expert judgement, Fischer et al. demonstrate how translocation feasibility can be assessed quantitatively and transparently for endangered, philopatric, and highly mobile species, such as Kuaka. Kuaka, or Whenua Hou Diving Petrels, are in dire straits. The population of this Critically Endangered seabird is estimated at ~200 adults. Kuaka occupy the smallest breeding area of any bird species in Aotearoa New … Continue reading A quantitative feasibility assessment for translocating highly mobile, endangered species

Evaluating the success of upland hay meadow restoration using green hay transfer

Ruth Starr-Keddle describes her latest research with the North Pennines Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty Partnership to further the knowledge base on upland hay meadows and investigate the success of seed addition of key indicator species for restoring the landscape. Over the last 50 years there have been substantial declines in botanical diversity of traditionally managed species-rich upland hay meadows (conforming to the UK National … Continue reading Evaluating the success of upland hay meadow restoration using green hay transfer

Hotspots in the Grid: Avian sensitivity and vulnerability to collision risk from energy infrastructure interactions In Europe and North Africa

A new paper, led by Jethro Gauld from the University of East Anglia and colleagues from across Europe, demonstrates how GPS tracking data can be a powerful tool for identifying areas where birds are most sensitive to new renewable energy development due to collision risks. The transition to zero carbon energy is essential to avoid runaway climate change. As nations strive to achieve their Net … Continue reading Hotspots in the Grid: Avian sensitivity and vulnerability to collision risk from energy infrastructure interactions In Europe and North Africa