Peer Review Week 2022: Creating and supporting trust in research 

Peer Review Week is an annual event to celebrate the value of peer review and its role in scholarly communication. In this post, we explore how the British Ecological Society journals support this year’s theme, ‘Research Integrity: Creating and supporting trust in research’.  The peer review system has been around for centuries and, despite some of its criticisms, remains a widely accepted method for research … Continue reading Peer Review Week 2022: Creating and supporting trust in research 

Editor’s Choice 58:9 Identifying a pathway towards recovery for depleted wild Pacific salmon populations in a large watershed under multiple stressors

Associate Editor, Hedley Grantham, introduces this month’s Editor’s Choice article by Lia Chalifour and colleagues, which evaluates the potential benefits of 14 management strategies on 19 conservation units of the five Pacific salmon species in the lower Fraser River, British Columbia, Canada. Salmon are an iconic and globally recognisable species. In the Northeast Pacific they are also an important commercial and recreational fish species with … Continue reading Editor’s Choice 58:9 Identifying a pathway towards recovery for depleted wild Pacific salmon populations in a large watershed under multiple stressors

Machine learning has an important role to play in marine conservation

Ecological monitoring is critical for conservation efforts, yet these data often feature strong class imbalances which complicate the development of models to predict such events. In their latest research, Michael W. Wade and colleagues propose two modelling frameworks for predicting exceptionally rare aggregatory behaviour of bull and blacktip sharks along the Gulf coast of Texas. Across many industries, leaders have begun leveraging the immense potential of … Continue reading Machine learning has an important role to play in marine conservation

Associate Editor mentoring: 2023 applications now open

If you are less than five years post-PhD, based in or from the Global South, and looking to develop your editorial experience alongside a revered board of Senior Editors, why not apply for the Journal of Applied Ecology Associate Editor mentoring opportunity? Each year the board welcomes new mentee Associate Editors with little or no editorial experience to take up this training post and gain experience of … Continue reading Associate Editor mentoring: 2023 applications now open

Research stories: Boxing for conservation

Authors Brian Burke and Darren O’Connell discuss the conservation of roseate terns at Europe’s largest colony on Rockabill Island in Dublin, Ireland, with their latest research highlighting the important role artificial nestboxes have played in the species’ population growth and recovery. The role of a tern warden on Rockabill Island has been described on more than one occasion as a dream job. A summer spent … Continue reading Research stories: Boxing for conservation

Applied autoethnography: A method for reporting best practice in ecological and environmental research

Kilian Murphy and colleagues propose applied autoethnography, a form of structured reflection whereby researchers use personal experience to contribute to understanding collaborative processes, as a repeatable protocol to describe inter-organisational interactions during the research process in ecology and environmental research. The publication of a scientific manuscript is the culmination of the long process of research, whereby the scientist shares the results of their study in … Continue reading Applied autoethnography: A method for reporting best practice in ecological and environmental research

Mapping 35 years of prescribed fire history

Authors Erin Rowland-Schaefer and Elizabeth Bach describe their latest Data Article presenting a visual record of the long fire history of Nachusa Grasslands, a tallgrass prairie restoration site in Illinois, USA. Fire has played a significant role in the development and management of tallgrass prairie ecosystems since before European colonization. While historically, fire was used by Indigenous communities to manage the movements of bison, today, … Continue reading Mapping 35 years of prescribed fire history

Editor’s Choice 58:8 Tree species that live slow, die older enhance tropical peat swamp restoration: Evidence from a systematic review

Associate Editor, Sharif Mukul speaks to the co-lead author of this month’s Editor’s Choice article, Stuart Smith, which presents results from a systematic review of tropical peat swamp forests reforestation projects across Southeast Asia. The restoration of degraded forested lands is a global priority, incentivised by international commitments to counteract decades of rapid deforestation. However, syntheses using seedling monitoring data from past reforestation projects remain … Continue reading Editor’s Choice 58:8 Tree species that live slow, die older enhance tropical peat swamp restoration: Evidence from a systematic review

Join The Applied Ecologist team as a Blog Associate Editor

We are seeking an enthusiastic ecologist with a passion for stimulating dialogue and communication across everyone involved in ecological research and practice to join the team in this voluntary role. Summary of the Role We are looking for an active ecologist with a passion for stimulating dialogue and communication across everyone involved in ecological research and practice. Part of the Editorial Boards for Journal Applied … Continue reading Join The Applied Ecologist team as a Blog Associate Editor

Badger social structure maintained despite selective culling

In their new study, Allen et al. present a case study in Northern Ireland (NI) showing how selective culling can be less disruptive to badger social structures than indiscriminate culling. This method could be an effective and more socially acceptable means of controlling bovine tuberculosis (bTB) in wildlife. The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has raised consciousness on the issue of human disturbance of ecosystems and how this … Continue reading Badger social structure maintained despite selective culling