Research stories: Strava, GBIF and Citizen Science

Lead author Caitlin Mandeville recalls how she and her co-authors kept their focus close to home in their latest research that explores connections between citizen science and recreation in natural areas. Just about every community has some small, unassuming natural areas that are mainly known to locals: a neighbourhood park, a small wildlife preserve, a field on the edge of town. These places might not … Continue reading Research stories: Strava, GBIF and Citizen Science

Making optimal adaptive management accessible to everyone

Author Sam Nicol describes his team’s latest research developing a new model to help managers easily identify and employ adaptive management interventions to protect threatened species. Adaptive management—what’s the problem? Adaptive management has been the coolest thing in conservation for almost 40 years – everyone wants to do it. Way back in the ‘80s, the elegant seminal formulations by Hollings and Walters proposed that conservation … Continue reading Making optimal adaptive management accessible to everyone

From the ground up: Understanding coffee agroforestry systems

Sarah Archibald describes her team’s latest research seeking to better understand emergent herbaceous communities in organic coffee agroforestry systems by identifying their taxonomic and functional diversity as well as their management by interviewing farmers in Costa Rica. Coffee agroecosystems range in management and diversity, from monocultures with chemical inputs to biologically complex multi-strata agroforestry systems. With the demand for organic coffee expected to increase by … Continue reading From the ground up: Understanding coffee agroforestry systems

Damilola Olanipon: Navigating through the odds – the experience of a female early career researcher in Nigeria

For Black History Month, the British Ecological Society (BES) journals are celebrating the work of Black ecologists from around the world and sharing their stories. The theme for UK Black History Month this year is Time for Change: Action Not Words. Damilola Olanipon—an early career researcher at Afe Babalola University, Nigeria—shares her story below. I was brought up by a single mother and, gaining admission … Continue reading Damilola Olanipon: Navigating through the odds – the experience of a female early career researcher in Nigeria

Mthokozisi Moyo: Accidental Ecologist to Seasonality “expert”

For Black History Month, the British Ecological Society (BES) journals are celebrating the work of Black ecologists from around the world and sharing their stories. The theme for UK Black History Month this year is Time for Change: Action Not Words. Mthokozisi Moyo – at the University of Witwatersrand, South Africa – shares his story below. How did you get into ecology? My name is Mthokozisi Moyo … Continue reading Mthokozisi Moyo: Accidental Ecologist to Seasonality “expert”

The proximity of rapeseed fields influences levels of forest damage by red deer

Deer can show transitional use between agricultural fields and forests for foraging and shelter which may have an effect on the level of forest damage. In their latest research, Anders Jarnemo and colleagues investigate this relationship by studying red deer in Skåne, Sweden. Red deer (Cervus elaphus) have been observed to cause severe damage to forest plantations through bark stripping, with tree species such as … Continue reading The proximity of rapeseed fields influences levels of forest damage by red deer

How can we limit wind turbine impacts on biodiversity?

There are growing concerns about the impact of renewable energy development on biodiversity. In their latest research, Camille Leroux and colleagues from the National Museum of Natural History of Paris, France, explore how wind turbines impact bat spatial distribution. World-wide policies have led to a drastic increase in renewable energy developments to tackle climate emergencies, either using solar, tidal or wind energy. While these energies … Continue reading How can we limit wind turbine impacts on biodiversity?

Yoseph Araya: Stepping up – towards diversifying learning and participation in natural spaces for all

For Black History Month, the British Ecological Society (BES) journals are celebrating the work of Black ecologists from around the world and sharing their stories. The theme for UK Black History Month this year is Time for Change: Action Not Words. Yoseph Araya—a researcher at The Open University—joins us again, following his 2020 blogpost, to share his story and recent journey. How did you get … Continue reading Yoseph Araya: Stepping up – towards diversifying learning and participation in natural spaces for all

Thobeka Gumede: A girl who made it against all odds

For Black History Month, the British Ecological Society (BES) journals are celebrating the work of Black ecologists from around the world and sharing their stories. The theme for UK Black History Month this year is Time for Change: Action Not Words. Thobeka Gumede – a PhD researcher at Centre for Functional Biodiversity, School of Life Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa – shares her story below. How … Continue reading Thobeka Gumede: A girl who made it against all odds

Peer Review Week 2022: Creating and supporting trust in research 

Peer Review Week is an annual event to celebrate the value of peer review and its role in scholarly communication. In this post, we explore how the British Ecological Society journals support this year’s theme, ‘Research Integrity: Creating and supporting trust in research’.  The peer review system has been around for centuries and, despite some of its criticisms, remains a widely accepted method for research … Continue reading Peer Review Week 2022: Creating and supporting trust in research