Hotspots in the Grid: Avian sensitivity and vulnerability to collision risk from energy infrastructure interactions In Europe and North Africa

A new paper, led by Jethro Gauld from the University of East Anglia and colleagues from across Europe, demonstrates how GPS tracking data can be a powerful tool for identifying areas where birds are most sensitive to new renewable energy development due to collision risks. The transition to zero carbon energy is essential to avoid runaway climate change. As nations strive to achieve their Net … Continue reading Hotspots in the Grid: Avian sensitivity and vulnerability to collision risk from energy infrastructure interactions In Europe and North Africa

Behind the cover 3:2 – Fire protects grasslands from woody species and benefits the birds that call this landscape home

Biodiversity is most rapidly declining on grasslands of all the terrestrial biomes, and large-scale interventions are much needed to restore these landscapes. In their latest Practice Insights, Caleb Roberts and colleagues showcase long-term efforts in successfully restoring the Loess Canyons, USA, using fire as tool. Find out more about the story behind the cover of our latest issue. Imagining the Great Plains of the United … Continue reading Behind the cover 3:2 – Fire protects grasslands from woody species and benefits the birds that call this landscape home

Large African herbivore diversity is essential in transformed landscapes for conserving dung beetle diversity

In their new study, Pryke, Roets and Samways discuss how a diverse range of large African herbivore species is essential for the conservation of dung beetles within transformed landscapes, and argue that the maintenance of functional diversity outside protected areas requires the inclusion of large mammals in conservation plans. Dung beetles need the dung of large mammals to feed and reproduce. In doing so, they … Continue reading Large African herbivore diversity is essential in transformed landscapes for conserving dung beetle diversity

Indigenous brigades change the spatial patterns of wildfires, and the influence of climate on fire regimes

In their new study, Oliveira et al. express the importance and value of Indigenous knowledge and Indigenous brigades for the management of increasingly occurring wildfires. Fire has been present in different biomes for millions of years and is a factor that can shape vegetation distribution patterns. However, lately there has been observed a higher frequency of growing wildfires that can cause great impacts on society … Continue reading Indigenous brigades change the spatial patterns of wildfires, and the influence of climate on fire regimes

How do fences affect animal movement behavior?

Each year, Journal of Applied Ecology awards the Southwood Prize to the best paper in the journal by an author at the start of their career. In this post, Wenjing Xu discusses her shortlisted paper which examined the behavioural responses of two migratory ungulate species to linear barriers in Wyoming, USA. Each year, thousands of migratory mule deer and pronghorn venture through the sagebrush plain in western Wyoming, … Continue reading How do fences affect animal movement behavior?

Riparian reserves protect butterfly communities in selectively logged tropical forest

In their new study, Gabriela Montejo-Kovacevich and colleagues consider whether riparian zones provide biodiversity conservation benefits for Butterflies. Selectively logged tropical forest is now more widespread than old-growth primary forest, except in the Amazon and Papua New Guinea. Logging forests for timber is less devastating for biodiversity than other types of land-use change that are ravaging through tropical regions, such as conversion to agriculture or … Continue reading Riparian reserves protect butterfly communities in selectively logged tropical forest

Amphibian resistance to chytridiomycosis increases following low-virulence chytrid fungal infection or drug-mediated clearance

Each year, Journal of Applied Ecology awards the Southwood Prize to the best paper in the journal by an author at the start of their career. In this post, Anthony Waddle (University of Melbourne, Australia) discusses his shortlisted paper which developed a vaccine approach for increasing amphibian resistance to chytridiomycosis. Globalization has allowed us to live comfortable lives, accessing resources that may be naturally scarce in the … Continue reading Amphibian resistance to chytridiomycosis increases following low-virulence chytrid fungal infection or drug-mediated clearance

A decision support tool to prioritize ballast water compliance monitoring by ranking risk of non-indigenous species establishment

Each year, Journal of Applied Ecology awards the Southwood Prize to the best paper in the journal by an author at the start of their career. In this post, Dr. Johanna Bradie (University of Windsor, Canada) discusses her shortlisted paper which reports the development of a decision support tool, known as a ballast water invasion probability tool, which automatically quantifies the risk of non-indigenous species associated with … Continue reading A decision support tool to prioritize ballast water compliance monitoring by ranking risk of non-indigenous species establishment

A predictive model for improving placement of wind turbines to minimise collision risk potential for a large soaring raptor

Each year, Journal of Applied Ecology awards the Southwood Prize to the best paper in the journal by an author at the start of their career. In this post, Megan Murgatroyd (HawkWatch International/FitzPatrick Institute of African Ornithology at the University of Cape Town) discusses her shortlisted paper which used GPS tracking data together with a digital elevation model to classify the spatial likelihood of wind turbine collisions for adult … Continue reading A predictive model for improving placement of wind turbines to minimise collision risk potential for a large soaring raptor

Knowledge sharing for shared success in the decade on ecosystem restoration

As part of our cross-society Special Feature on the UN Decade on Ecosystem Restoration, Pia Bradler and author Emma Ladouceur discuss the latest Perspective article calling for greater knowledge-sharing to inform successful restoration practice. In our latest article in Ecological Solutions and Evidence, we call for greater restoration knowledge sharing as part of the UN-declared Decade on Ecosystem Restoration. Shared knowledge includes results from case … Continue reading Knowledge sharing for shared success in the decade on ecosystem restoration