When stressed by both pesticides and parasites, honey bees do better than expected

In their latest research, Bird and colleagues perform a meta‐analysis to gain a clearer view of the combined effects of parasites and pesticides on honey bee health. Honey bees pollinate about a third of all crops. Without them, the production of everything from almonds to zucchinis would grind to halt, which makes it especially alarming that honey bees have being dying at increasing rates over … Continue reading When stressed by both pesticides and parasites, honey bees do better than expected

Cameron Hodges: Using radio-telemetry to better understand how a highly venomous snake lives among people

In this Q&A, we ask author Cameron Hodges about his team’s research monitoring the behaviour of a Malayan krait near a university dormitory in Thailand, and find out a little bit more about the author himself. Go to: The research | The bigger picture | About the Author The research What’s your article about? Our article provides a detailed description of the observed movements, habitat … Continue reading Cameron Hodges: Using radio-telemetry to better understand how a highly venomous snake lives among people

Shortlist announced for Ecological Solutions and Evidence early career researcher award

Each year, each of the BES journals award a prize for the best paper by an author at the start of their career. Today, we present the shortlisted papers for the first Ecological Solutions and Evidence early career researcher award based on the journal’s inaugural volume. The winner will be selected in the coming weeks and will be announced with the other prize winners across … Continue reading Shortlist announced for Ecological Solutions and Evidence early career researcher award

Shortlist announced for Southwood Prize early career researcher award

Each year Journal of Applied Ecology awards the Southwood Prize to the best paper in the journal by an author at the start of their career. Today we present the shortlisted papers for this year’s award, based on the previous (57th) volume of the journal. The winner will be selected in the coming weeks so watch this space for future announcements. This year’s shortlisted candidates are: Experimental … Continue reading Shortlist announced for Southwood Prize early career researcher award

International Women’s Day 2021: #ChooseToChallenge

The theme for International Women’s Day 2021 is #ChooseToChallenge. “A challenged world is an alert world. Individually, we’re all responsible for our own thoughts and actions – all day, every day. We can all choose to challenge and call out gender bias and inequality. We can all choose to seek out and celebrate women’s achievements. Collectively, we can all help create an inclusive world. From … Continue reading International Women’s Day 2021: #ChooseToChallenge

Repatriating solitary felids: the case for seeking homes for conflict-borne leopards in southern Africa

Photo © Vasti Botha Translocating large carnivores to reduce human-wildlife conflict have historically failed, but recent improvements in satellite technology have enabled better monitoring and success. In their latest research, Power et al. report on the outcomes of repatriating 16 leopards across a South African province. Leopards need little introduction. These large felids are ubiquitous across Africa and large parts of Asia. However, being so … Continue reading Repatriating solitary felids: the case for seeking homes for conflict-borne leopards in southern Africa

Editor’s Choice 58:3 Eagle fatalities are reduced by automated curtailment of wind turbines

Journal of Applied Ecology’s March Editor’s Choice tests the efficacy of an automated curtailment system in reducing counts of fatalities of eagles. Associate Editor, Kulbhushansingh Suryawanshi, introduces the selected article by Chris J W McClure, which shows that this method substantially reduced eagle fatalities, offering potential opportunities to lessen the conflict between wind energy and raptor conservation. We need greener renewable energy to fight climate … Continue reading Editor’s Choice 58:3 Eagle fatalities are reduced by automated curtailment of wind turbines

Gap filling an ecosystem monitoring network

In their latest research, Guerin and colleagues combine the predictive power of Generalised Dissimilarity Modelling (GDM) with practical considerations to strategically gap‐fill an established network of ecosystem surveillance plots—TERN Ausplots. Monitoring Australia’s vast and diverse terrestrial ecosystems is a complex and time-consuming task. To effectively detect, interpret and act on changes in Australian ecosystems, it is vital that scientists and land managers have access to … Continue reading Gap filling an ecosystem monitoring network

Smaller adults and bigger juveniles: how global warming is affecting our fish populations.

There is mounting evidence that climate change is affecting commercial fish species. In their latest research, Ikpewe and colleagues investigate the effect of temperature on fish sizes in two neighbouring regions, displaying contrasting trends in warming. The warming of our oceans due to climate change is affecting marine life in numerous ways.  Fish populations, in particular, are experiencing changes in productivity, distribution, growth and the … Continue reading Smaller adults and bigger juveniles: how global warming is affecting our fish populations.

How can we address mismatches in conservation research and practice?

Natalie Dubois and Rebecca Jarvis reflect on the findings of a new collaborative article examining where the conservation community has made progress aligning research and practice. For too long, conservation research was viewed as a one-directional path from researchers to practitioners. The field has since moved towards a better understanding of the interdependent nature of knowledge generation and use, but mismatches in the spaces between … Continue reading How can we address mismatches in conservation research and practice?