Smaller adults and bigger juveniles: how global warming is affecting our fish populations.

There is mounting evidence that climate change is affecting commercial fish species. In their latest research, Ikpewe and colleagues investigate the effect of temperature on fish sizes in two neighbouring regions, displaying contrasting trends in warming. The warming of our oceans due to climate change is affecting marine life in numerous ways.  Fish populations, in particular, are experiencing changes in productivity, distribution, growth and the … Continue reading Smaller adults and bigger juveniles: how global warming is affecting our fish populations.

Combining seascape connectivity with cumulative impact assessment to support ecosystem‐based marine spatial planning

Cumulative impact assessment (CIA) is a simple yet promising approach to guide marine management interventions, but one not without limitations. Jonsson and colleagues report a novel method which combines CIA with seascape connectivity to account for remote effects of local environmental impact. Human activities are having a catostrphic impact on ocean biodiversity, meaning effective policies and management actions are needed to facilitate the sustainable use … Continue reading Combining seascape connectivity with cumulative impact assessment to support ecosystem‐based marine spatial planning

Editor’s Choice 57:12 – Best-practice forestry management delivers diminishing returns for coral reefs with increased land-clearing

Associate Editor, Dr Kiran Dhanjal-Adams, introduces the December Editor’s Choice paper, which demonstrates that sediment runoff from industrial logging can affect food security and livelihoods in the Solomon Islands. Kolombangara is an island in the Western Province of the Solomon Islands in the South West Pacific. The island harbors a large variety of ecosystems, ranging from mangrove ecosystems at sea level to cloud forest ecosystems along the crater, … Continue reading Editor’s Choice 57:12 – Best-practice forestry management delivers diminishing returns for coral reefs with increased land-clearing

The importance of wetland margin microhabitat mosaics

The use of microhabitats for thermoregulation in wetland species is poorly studied. In their latest research, Ryeland and colleagues conduct field observations of nine species of shorebird to test whether birds selectively use microhabitats across temperatures. Wetlands, and the species that rely upon them, are under significant threat world‐wide, and managing habitat for migratory wetland species, such as shorebirds, is particularly challenging because it requires … Continue reading The importance of wetland margin microhabitat mosaics

Lionel Yamb: Saving sharks in Cameroon waters

For Black History Month, the British Ecological Society (BES) journals are celebrating the work of Black ecologists from around the world and sharing their stories. Lionel Yamb, who sits on the BES Equality and Diversity Working Group, shares his story below. My name is Lionel Yamb; I’m an early career marine ecologist working in Cameroon with the Institute of Agricultural Research for Development (IRAD). I … Continue reading Lionel Yamb: Saving sharks in Cameroon waters

Protected high-value reefs and movement pathways improve conservation of reef sharks

New research from Gerardo Martín and colleagues looks at how we might support shark species if protected areas are multi-use and still open to fishing. The key is focusing on reefs preferred by sharks and developing our knowledge of shark movement pathways. Here the authors share their work and look at how we can improve species conservation while still supporting communities that depend on coral … Continue reading Protected high-value reefs and movement pathways improve conservation of reef sharks

How can movement ecology support marine protected areas in preventing illegal fishing?

In their recently published work, David Jacoby and colleagues combine long-term shark tracking data with that of enforcement patrols to see how behaviour can influence the vulnerability of marine life to illegal fishing in one of the world’s largest marine protected areas. Continue reading How can movement ecology support marine protected areas in preventing illegal fishing?

A new approach for understanding the role of human-made structures in the North Sea

Hannah Tidbury and colleagues at the Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science recently used social network analysis to aid marine spatial planning. Here Hannah explains a little more about the approach behind their work and what it means for oil and gas infrastructure. Connectivity between communities of organisms that live within marine environment is important because isolated communities are more vulnerable to extinction. Therefore, … Continue reading A new approach for understanding the role of human-made structures in the North Sea

Identifying hotspots of threats to marine megafauna

In newly published research, A framework for mapping the distribution of seabirds by integrating tracking, demography and phenology, Ana P. B. Carneiro et al. present a new framework aiming to tackle challenges of tracking seabird movement and ultimately improve bycatch mitigation measures. There is increased global awareness that our oceans are under threat. Marine megafauna such as seabirds, marine turtles, marine mammals, sharks and rays … Continue reading Identifying hotspots of threats to marine megafauna

Predator and scavenger movements as opportunities for pathogen spread among endangered seabirds

Infectious diseases have recently been acknowledged as an important threat for wild populations, notably seabirds. In order to implement efficient surveillance and management programmes, it is critical to look beyond the sick individuals to identify the individuals or species involved in cryptic epidemiological processes, such as pathogen spread. Amandine Gamble et al. summarise their recent research on the potential role of predators and scavengers in … Continue reading Predator and scavenger movements as opportunities for pathogen spread among endangered seabirds