Knowledge sharing for shared success in the decade on ecosystem restoration

As part of our cross-society Special Feature on the UN Decade on Ecosystem Restoration, Pia Bradler and author Emma Ladouceur discuss the latest Perspective article calling for greater knowledge-sharing to inform successful restoration practice. In our latest article in Ecological Solutions and Evidence, we call for greater restoration knowledge sharing as part of the UN-declared Decade on Ecosystem Restoration. Shared knowledge includes results from case … Continue reading Knowledge sharing for shared success in the decade on ecosystem restoration

Helping practitioners to make and document conservation decisions: the Evidence-to-Decision tool

In this contribution post, Alec Christie introduces a novel tool guiding and encouraging practitioners to document and report the evidence and reasoning behind conservation decisions. The tool guide and template are permanently archived in Applied Ecology Resources. Originally posted and adapted from the Conservation Evidence blog and Conservation Land Management.. When undertaking actions to restore habitats or conserve wildlife, we often have to make difficult … Continue reading Helping practitioners to make and document conservation decisions: the Evidence-to-Decision tool

Twenty years of tallgrass prairie restoration in northern Illinois, USA

Elizabeth Bach and Bill Kleiman share their latest findings from monitoring long-term ecosystem restoration on The Nature Conservancy’s Nachusa Grassland preserve. The challenges facing our planet can feel overwhelming and paralyzing. Climate is changing, biodiversity is declining, people are struggling to be in community with one another. However, there are signs of hope. The United Nations declared 2021-2030 as the Decade on Restoration, upholding ecosystem … Continue reading Twenty years of tallgrass prairie restoration in northern Illinois, USA

Bee abundance estimates vary by collection method and flowering richness

Monitoring bee populations is becoming increasingly important and commonplace, but do current methods produce reliable estimates of bee communities? Authors Marirose Kuhlman and Philip Hahn explore this question in their latest research. Wild bees are the main pollinators in nearly all terrestrial ecosystems and are essential to the reproductive cycles of many native plants, agricultural crops, and to the success of habitat restoration projects. Because … Continue reading Bee abundance estimates vary by collection method and flowering richness

ESE Editor’s Choice 2:2 – Restoring ecosystems and our well-being

Associate Editor Elizabeth Bach introduces our latest Editor’s Choice article by Patrick Swanson who calls for a new paradigm in ecosystem restoration called ‘Restorative recreation’. Ecosystem restoration seeks to reunite native plants and animals in degraded ecosystem, improving biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Many people deeply involved in ecosystem restoration also recognize the process of learning and restoring an ecosystem deepens our understanding of the natural … Continue reading ESE Editor’s Choice 2:2 – Restoring ecosystems and our well-being

Restorative recreation: One landowner’s restoration experience in Iowa’s Loess Hills

In his latest From Practice article, author and landowner Patrick Swanson describes his experience restoring a native prairie remnant in Iowa’s Loess Hills and introduces a new paradigm that maximizes benefits to personal wellbeing while improving the landscape for other species. This article is part of the cross-journal, cross-society Special Feature on the UN Decade on Ecosystem Restoration. Ecosystems worldwide are under mounting stress from … Continue reading Restorative recreation: One landowner’s restoration experience in Iowa’s Loess Hills

Effectively integrating experiments into conservation practice

How can evidence be generated from conservation practice? In their latest review, Nancy Ockendon and colleagues seek to raise awareness of opportunities to embed experiments in conservation and restoration management, in order to generate new evidence and ultimately improve practice. Originally posted and adapted from the Endangered Landscapes Programme. Why do we need more experiments? It’s widely understood that it is important to consider the … Continue reading Effectively integrating experiments into conservation practice

ESE Editor’s Choice 2:1 – Answering the call for evidence-based conservation science teaching

Is conservation science failing to prepare students to make an effective contribution to conservation practice? Associate Editor Costanza Rampini introduces our latest Editor’s Choice article by Downey et al. calling for a wider teaching of evidence-based conservation. Although the past 20 years have seen a huge increase in the amount of scientific information available to conservationists, conservation practitioners and land managers still too often rely … Continue reading ESE Editor’s Choice 2:1 – Answering the call for evidence-based conservation science teaching

Seeing in the dark: Detecting and protecting cryptic nesting species using UAV thermal cameras

Authors Mike Shewring and Jim Vafidis share a video summary of their latest From Practice article using UAV-mounted thermal imaging to detect cryptic nesting European Nightjars in Wales, UK. Confirming the presence and location of cryptic nesting species is a significant fieldwork challenge in ecological monitoring. Nest sites can be located through direct observation or capture and radio tracking of breeding individuals; however, such work … Continue reading Seeing in the dark: Detecting and protecting cryptic nesting species using UAV thermal cameras

Repatriating solitary felids: the case for seeking homes for conflict-borne leopards in southern Africa

Photo © Vasti Botha Translocating large carnivores to reduce human-wildlife conflict have historically failed, but recent improvements in satellite technology have enabled better monitoring and success. In their latest research, Power et al. report on the outcomes of repatriating 16 leopards across a South African province. Leopards need little introduction. These large felids are ubiquitous across Africa and large parts of Asia. However, being so … Continue reading Repatriating solitary felids: the case for seeking homes for conflict-borne leopards in southern Africa