ESE Editor’s Choice 1:1 – Understanding invasive plant phenology to better protect native island species

Laysan albatrosses amongst a field of golden crownbeard © David Dow Taylor et al.’s recent From Practice article details a case study on Midway Atoll that demonstrates the importance of understanding plant phenology to better control and eradicate non-native species. Lead Editor Carolyn Kurle highlights this article as the inaugural Ecological Solutions and Evidence Editor’s Choice. Invasive species on islands are an enormous problem; largely … Continue reading ESE Editor’s Choice 1:1 – Understanding invasive plant phenology to better protect native island species

Using phenology to guide invasive plant management

Successful restoration of degraded land often depends on well-timed interventions to control invasive species. In their recently published article, Taylor and colleagues present a case study of the effects of incorporating phenology information into invasive plant control operations at Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), USA. The authors share their story below. Towards the end of April, millions of birds, including warblers, tanagers, buntings, grosbeaks … Continue reading Using phenology to guide invasive plant management

Introducing The Applied Ecologist … your new-look blog

The Applied Ecologist’s Blog has a new look and, with it, a new name! We’re pleased to introduce The Applied Ecologist. Bridging the gap between researchers, practitioners and policymakers, this is your home for applied ecological content from the British Ecological Society. We’ll still be sharing research news from Journal of Applied Ecology as well as topical contributions from our global community of practitioners, researchers … Continue reading Introducing The Applied Ecologist … your new-look blog

Ecological Solutions and Evidence: perspectives from research, practice and policy (part 2)

The Ecological Solutions and Evidence Editorial Board boasts expertise from a wide range of ecological sectors; from research institutions and NGOs to public body organisations and consultancies. In this second part of our two-part series, we ask our Associate Editors – who work in or in the interface between research, practice and policy – why people should submit to the Journal and what kind of … Continue reading Ecological Solutions and Evidence: perspectives from research, practice and policy (part 2)

Ecological Solutions and Evidence: perspectives from research, practice and policy (part 1)

The Ecological Solutions and Evidence Editorial Board boasts expertise from a wide range of ecological sectors; from research institutions and NGOs to public body organisations and consultancies. In this first part of our two-part series, we ask our Associate Editors – who work in or in the interface between research, practice and policy – to tell us a little about themselves and what need the … Continue reading Ecological Solutions and Evidence: perspectives from research, practice and policy (part 1)

Busy practitioner? Think carefully before choosing which academic conference to attend

With conference season upon us, Errol Douwes (Environmental Planning and Climate Protection, Durban) shares advice on how to make the most of the academic conference circuit from a practitioner’s perspective. What tips do you have? Leave a comment below or Tweet us @JAppliedEcology. I’ve often wondered if and how other practitioners decide on which conferences they will attend. It’s very seldom that I’ve been invited … Continue reading Busy practitioner? Think carefully before choosing which academic conference to attend

The bear necessities of grizzly bear population recovery in Alberta, Canada

In our latest Practitioner’s Perspective, Towards grizzly bear population recovery in a modern landscape, Sean Coogan explains how new, multi-disciplinary approaches are being used to protect Canada’s threatened grizzly bears. The management and conservation of large carnivores can be socially controversial and politically charged. To make matters more complicated, the data required to make effective scientifically-informed management decisions may be lacking, or extremely difficult to … Continue reading The bear necessities of grizzly bear population recovery in Alberta, Canada

Solutions science – Ciencia de soluciones

Claire Wordley (Conservation Evidence project, University of Cambridge) looks at evaluation and evidence in testing interventions and asks the question, ‘What works in conservation’? A Spanish version  of this post is also available. Evidence in conservation: does it matter? What do scaring juvenile offenders, giving steroids to head trauma patients, and bat bridges all have in common? They are all examples of interventions that were … Continue reading Solutions science – Ciencia de soluciones

Every restoration is unique

In the second of our series of blogs to accompany the recently-published Special Feature, Toward prediction in the restoration of biodiversity, Katharine Stuble describes her work in Every restoration is unique: testing year effects and site effects as drivers of initial restoration trajectories. Restoration practitioners are acutely aware that the outcomes of their efforts are strongly contingent on a slew of factors.  Some are well … Continue reading Every restoration is unique

Research, management and local knowledge: an innovative approach to invasive species control

Executive Editor, Marc Cadotte shares his thoughts on Jennifer Firn and colleagues’ new article, Integrating local knowledge and research to refine the management of an invasive non-native grass in critically endangered grassy woodlands and why utilising local knowledge is vital if we’re to provide successful solutions to environmental issues.  While many hurdles hamper the successful application of ecological concepts and theories to developing solutions to environmental … Continue reading Research, management and local knowledge: an innovative approach to invasive species control