Editor’s Choice 59:7 The key to seabird conservation – mitigating bycatch from industrial fisheries and eradicating invasive species

Associate Editor, Maria Paniw, introduces this month’s Editor’s Choice article by Dasnon et al., which presents some good news for seabird conservation: combined efforts of avoiding bycatch from commercial fisheries and reducing impacts of invasive species can effectively boost population sizes of vulnerable marine pelagic species. Industrial fishing activities can cause substantial damage, not only to fish stocks but also to pelagic vertebrate predators that … Continue reading Editor’s Choice 59:7 The key to seabird conservation – mitigating bycatch from industrial fisheries and eradicating invasive species

Apparently stable albatross population is actually decreasing due to mouse predation

Conservation organisations struggle to directly assist all threatened species, so deciding where to spend limited resources is a common problem. In a new paper, Oppel and colleagues show that, for long-lived species, a population may decrease long before this trend becomes evident in the part of the population that can be counted. Albatrosses are among the largest flying birds in the world, and they can … Continue reading Apparently stable albatross population is actually decreasing due to mouse predation

Harnessing drainage canals for biodiversity conservation

A new paper led by Csaba Tölgyesi from the University of Szeged, Hungary, shows that drainage canals can be harnessed for biodiversity conservation in desiccated, heavily transformed regions by reconciling the interests of opposing stakeholders. Drainage and subsequent land cultivation have been a major threat to global wetland ecosystems for centuries. In Europe, most lowland fens have been drained; approximately 25% of the arable land … Continue reading Harnessing drainage canals for biodiversity conservation

Drivers of the Australian native pet trade: The role of species traits, socioeconomic attributes and regulatory systems

In their new study, Adam Toomes et al. discuss what are the drivers and problems of the exotic pet trade, and how we can make pet trade regulations more effective. Most people associate the word ‘pet’ with domesticated animals like cats and dogs, yet more exotic options such as ornamental rainbowfish, venomous snakes and rare parrots are becoming increasingly popular. With the modern advent of … Continue reading Drivers of the Australian native pet trade: The role of species traits, socioeconomic attributes and regulatory systems

Hotspots of pest-induced US urban tree death: culprits, impacted tree species, and spatial hotspots

In their latest research Emma J. Hudgins, Frank H. Koch, Mark J. Ambrose, and Brian Leung, discuss the economic implications of pest-induced tree deaths in the US. Urban trees are key to the wellbeing of city dwellers but are at high risk of mortality from insect pests, due to having high rates of exposure to invasive species as enabled by trade, travel, and other human … Continue reading Hotspots of pest-induced US urban tree death: culprits, impacted tree species, and spatial hotspots

Cutting non-native trees helps, but may not be enough to restore coastal scrub invaded by pines

Invasive non-native trees can cause structural and functional changes in plant communities, but how do their impact change over time? Michele de Sá Dechoum and colleagues explore this in their latest research on a coastal ecosystems in southern Brazil. We learn, since growing up, that we should plant trees. There is no doubt that trees have very important environmental and social roles, especially in the … Continue reading Cutting non-native trees helps, but may not be enough to restore coastal scrub invaded by pines

How do you solve a problem like Molinia?

The increasing dominance of the invasive purple moor grass (Molinia caerulea) on blanket bogs is a growing threat to diversity and carbon storage. In this post, practitioners from Moors for the Future Partnership give their account of the team’s latest research attempting to reverse these effects. Reducing the domination of Molinia caerulea on blanket bogs to a more Sphagnum-rich, characteristically boggy landscape has been a … Continue reading How do you solve a problem like Molinia?

Protecting an iconic desert one pixel at a time

When dealing with highly invasive plants in fragile ecosystems, managers need effective management tools to prioritize their time and efforts. In their recently published Data Article, Gerst and colleagues describe a new tool by the USA National Phenology Network to help invasive buffelgrass managers efficiently schedule herbicide treatment efforts. The Sonoran Desert, which covers the southern half of the Arizona, southeastern California, and large portions … Continue reading Protecting an iconic desert one pixel at a time

A database of Indian alien vascular flora

Author Achyut Kumar Banerjee introduces his team’s latest Data Article describing ILORA: a database for alien vascular flora in India. India is a land of cultural, geological and biological diversity. Throughout its history, India has been invaded and occupied multiple times, and numerous plant species were introduced during this time. Botanical imperialism reached its zenith during British rule with the establishment of networks of botanical … Continue reading A database of Indian alien vascular flora

Editor’s Choice 58:11: Invasion theory as a management tool for increasing native biodiversity in urban ecosystems

Senior Editor, Martin A. Nuñez, introduces November’s Editor’s Choice article by Cadotte and colleagues, which proposes a novel application of invasion biology in an urban environment. Biological invasions are a big problem for the economy, environment, and human health. As a result, there exists a deep theoretical framework that has developed over the last four decades, fueled by data from numerous invasive species across the … Continue reading Editor’s Choice 58:11: Invasion theory as a management tool for increasing native biodiversity in urban ecosystems