Catch them if you can! A combined effort by citizens and scientists to monitor mosquitoes in Germany

In their latest research, Pernat and colleagues evaluate the performance of the German citizen science project ‘Mückenatlas’, in comparison to professional mosquito monitoring efforts. Mosquitoes – everyone knows them, hardly anyone likes them, and as carriers of pathogens, they can also pose a threat to the health of humans and animals. These negative connotations associated with mosquitos have been put to use by Mückenatlas, a … Continue reading Catch them if you can! A combined effort by citizens and scientists to monitor mosquitoes in Germany

Editor’s Choice 57:10 – Testing the relative effects of biocontrol and herbicide: finding an evidence-based management decision to control invasive plants

Journal of Applied Ecology’s October Editor’s Choice compares biocontrol and herbicide as approaches to invasive species management. Associate Editor, Rafael D. Zenni introduces the selected article by Paul G. Peterson and colleagues, which explores ‘efficacy, non-target effects and secondary invasion’. This post is also available in Portuguese here. In most ecosystems, controlling invasive alien plants is necessary in order to reduce and mitigate the negative … Continue reading Editor’s Choice 57:10 – Testing the relative effects of biocontrol and herbicide: finding an evidence-based management decision to control invasive plants

Testagem dos efeitos relativos de controle biológico e herbicida no controle de plantas exóticas invasoras para tomada de decisão baseada em evidências

This Editor’s Choice summary by Rafael D. Zenni is also available in English here. O controle de plantas exóticas invasoras é uma necessidade na maioria dos ecossistemas do planeta para reduzir e mitigar os impactos negativos causados ​​por invasões biológicas a biodiversidade nativa e aos serviços ecossistêmicos. No entanto, existem vários métodos de controle e escolher a solução mais eficaz, menos prejudicial e mais permanente … Continue reading Testagem dos efeitos relativos de controle biológico e herbicida no controle de plantas exóticas invasoras para tomada de decisão baseada em evidências

Targeting survey and monitoring efforts on roads could help us better understand population changes in introduced carnivores

Carnivores usually occur over large areas in low numbers, which sometimes makes them difficult to find. In their recently published article, Hayley Geyle and colleagues assessed the effectiveness of different camera trap survey designs for detecting feral cats and red foxes, and looked at how this influenced their ability to determine whether populations had changed in response to control through time. Introduced carnivores in Australia … Continue reading Targeting survey and monitoring efforts on roads could help us better understand population changes in introduced carnivores

ESE Editor’s Choice 1:1 – Understanding invasive plant phenology to better protect native island species

Laysan albatrosses amongst a field of golden crownbeard © David Dow Taylor et al.’s recent From Practice article details a case study on Midway Atoll that demonstrates the importance of understanding plant phenology to better control and eradicate non-native species. Lead Editor Carolyn Kurle highlights this article as the inaugural Ecological Solutions and Evidence Editor’s Choice. Invasive species on islands are an enormous problem; largely … Continue reading ESE Editor’s Choice 1:1 – Understanding invasive plant phenology to better protect native island species

Is invasion success explained by enemy release?

The cover for Journal of Applied Ecology issue 57:06 shows a Cuban treefrog in Florida, USA. Discussing the research behind the image, Elizabeth Roznik explains how invasive species such as this can outcompete native frogs due to their large body sizes, fast growth rates, and tolerance of parasites.

Invasive species are among the leading threats to native wildlife. Understanding the mechanisms underlying invasions can help us manage invasive species and their impacts. Continue reading Is invasion success explained by enemy release?

How can control of invading plant pathogens increase their rate of spread? How can we prevent it?

Ryan Sharp and colleagues investigate the answers to both of these questions and discuss their recent work, The effect of competition on the control of invading plant pathogens, published in Journal of Applied Ecology.

When pathogens invade into an area, they may find themselves in competition with already endemic pathogen strains. This competition can severely limit the spread of the invader. Control methods generally do not distinguish between pathogen strains. Therefore, when control is applied, both invasive and endemic strains are affected. Continue reading How can control of invading plant pathogens increase their rate of spread? How can we prevent it?

Using phenology to guide invasive plant management

Successful restoration of degraded land often depends on well-timed interventions to control invasive species. In their recently published article, Taylor and colleagues present a case study of the effects of incorporating phenology information into invasive plant control operations at Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), USA. The authors share their story below. Towards the end of April, millions of birds, including warblers, tanagers, buntings, grosbeaks … Continue reading Using phenology to guide invasive plant management

Cover stories: escapes from aquaculture

Using the example of sturgeons in the Yangtze River and impacts on the critically endangered Chinese sturgeon, work by Rui-Ting Ju et al. looks into policies around escaping non-native species from aquaculture. The corresponding cover image for issue 57:01 was taken by Ping Zhuang. Sturgeon farming is expanding worldwide due to the overexploitation of wild stocks. In China, the main farmed species are non-native species … Continue reading Cover stories: escapes from aquaculture

Private boats in the Mediterranean have extremely high potential to spread alien species

British Ecological Society press release A Mediterranean-wide study has found that 71% of sampled recreational boats hosted alien marine species. Over half carried an alien species that was not yet present in the marina the boat was visiting. The research is published in the British Ecological Society Journal of Applied Ecology. This is the first study in the Mediterranean to combine boat and marina sampling data … Continue reading Private boats in the Mediterranean have extremely high potential to spread alien species