Editor’s Choice 58:9 Identifying a pathway towards recovery for depleted wild Pacific salmon populations in a large watershed under multiple stressors

Associate Editor, Hedley Grantham, introduces this month’s Editor’s Choice article by Lia Chalifour and colleagues, which evaluates the potential benefits of 14 management strategies on 19 conservation units of the five Pacific salmon species in the lower Fraser River, British Columbia, Canada. Salmon are an iconic and globally recognisable species. In the Northeast Pacific they are also an important commercial and recreational fish species with … Continue reading Editor’s Choice 58:9 Identifying a pathway towards recovery for depleted wild Pacific salmon populations in a large watershed under multiple stressors

Eight steps to urban amphibian conservation: Framework to translate ecological knowledge to action

New research by Lee et al. demonstrates the utility of an eight-step framework to identify priority wetland habitats and movement corridors for urban amphibian conservation in cities. Author Nicole Kahal explains more in this blog post. Amphibians are one of the most imperilled species assemblages with diversity and abundance declines reported globally. Considered a key indicator of ecological condition, amphibians face many challenges in the … Continue reading Eight steps to urban amphibian conservation: Framework to translate ecological knowledge to action

Electric fencing safeguards declining wader populations

Originally posted and adapted from a RSPB Centre for Conservation Science and Vogelbescherming Nederland blog. Insufficient reproduction as a consequence of predation is a major determinant of population decline in ground-nesting birds. Malcolm Burgess and colleagues discuss their latest study on the effectiveness of using electric fences as a preventative measure. A common driver of the decline of ground-nesting meadow birds, especially waders, is insufficient … Continue reading Electric fencing safeguards declining wader populations

The road to recovery: New research identifies priority actions for lower Fraser River salmon

In their latest research, Dr Lia Chalifour and colleagues evaluate the potential benefits of 14 management strategies – spanning fisheries, habitat, pollution, pathogens, hatcheries and predation management dimensions – on 19 genetically and ecologically distinct populations of the five Pacific salmon species in the lower Fraser River, British Columbia, Canada. Fisheries closures in British Columbia have become the norm, with ‘good years’ for returning stocks … Continue reading The road to recovery: New research identifies priority actions for lower Fraser River salmon

The importance of indirect effects of climate change adaptations on alpine and pre-alpine freshwater systems

Feature photo edited from © Martin Laurenceau In their latest Perspective, Morgane Brosse and colleagues delve into the impact of human efforts to reduce or mitigate climate change, its effects on alpine freshwater environments and the role of specific management and policy decisions in determining the nature of these impacts. In an effort to address the threat of global change, much pressure is put on … Continue reading The importance of indirect effects of climate change adaptations on alpine and pre-alpine freshwater systems

Functional Biofilm on Intertidal Flats: A New Conservation Priority for Shorebirds

Intertidal flats are essential foraging areas for shorebirds but are severely impacted by climate and anthropogenic change. In their latest review, Kuwae and colleagues explore the effects of interventions that focus on intertidal biofilm for shorebird recovery. A version of this post is available in Japanese. Why shorebird species have been plummeting in numbers worldwide remains a subject of intense speculation and mounting conservation concern. However, … Continue reading Functional Biofilm on Intertidal Flats: A New Conservation Priority for Shorebirds

シギ・チドリ類の保全策として重要な干潟上のバイオフィルム

干潟はシギ・チドリ類にとって不可欠な採餌場であるが、気候変動や人為的影響によって深刻な影響を受けている。桑江朝比呂氏らの研究グループは、バイオフィルムに焦点を当てた干潟生態系への積極的介入によるシギ・チドリ類の回復効果について、最新の総説で探っている。A version of this post is available in English. Continue reading シギ・チドリ類の保全策として重要な干潟上のバイオフィルム

Can artificial floods restore ecological health below the riverbed?

Kate Mathers and colleagues describe their latest research which aims to fill a much needed knowledge gap in the effects of artificial floods on subsurface habitats Naturally, river systems and their flow regimes are dynamic, reacting to changing meteorological events such as intense rainfall or annual snowmelt. This hydrological variability is vital in supporting a healthy river system because fluctuating flows regulate sediment transport (gravels … Continue reading Can artificial floods restore ecological health below the riverbed?

Temporal trends in geographic clines of salmon eggs associated with global warming and hatchery programs

Koh Hasegawa and colleagues describe their latest research examining the geographic clines in Japanese chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta). Many animal and plant species show geographic clines which are often recognized as adaptations to the associated transitional environments. A well-known example is that the body size of bears increase in more northern regions. Even people may notice clines in their daily lives, such as people in … Continue reading Temporal trends in geographic clines of salmon eggs associated with global warming and hatchery programs

Using Indigenous and Western Science as a pathway for freshwater research across Canada

Steven Alexander and colleagues discuss their team’s latest research examining the extent to which Indigenous science and knowledge contribute to freshwater research and monitoring across Canada. There are many benefits to drawing upon diverse knowledge systems in environmental research. Such practices – referred to by various terms including bridging, weaving, or braiding – have been shown to improve our collective understanding of environmental change, expand … Continue reading Using Indigenous and Western Science as a pathway for freshwater research across Canada