Restorative recreation: One landowner’s restoration experience in Iowa’s Loess Hills

In his latest From Practice article, author and landowner Patrick Swanson describes his experience restoring a native prairie remnant in Iowa’s Loess Hills and introduces a new paradigm that maximizes benefits to personal wellbeing while improving the landscape for other species. This article is part of the cross-journal, cross-society Special Feature on the UN Decade on Ecosystem Restoration. Ecosystems worldwide are under mounting stress from … Continue reading Restorative recreation: One landowner’s restoration experience in Iowa’s Loess Hills

How can we address mismatches in conservation research and practice?

Natalie Dubois and Rebecca Jarvis reflect on the findings of a new collaborative article examining where the conservation community has made progress aligning research and practice. For too long, conservation research was viewed as a one-directional path from researchers to practitioners. The field has since moved towards a better understanding of the interdependent nature of knowledge generation and use, but mismatches in the spaces between … Continue reading How can we address mismatches in conservation research and practice?

The need for a code of practice for mosquito management in European wetlands

Bringing together multidisciplinary expertise, Martinou et al. build a framework that aims to balance the priorities of wetland conservation and mosquito control.  

Wetlands provide essential resources to human societies, and the associated biodiversity associated with wetlands has an estimated value ranging from US $44,597- ($)195,478 per hectare per year. Governments around the world have enacted legislation, policies and regulations including the Clean Water Act (United States) and the Water Act (Australia) to protect wetlands from a variety of human activities. Continue reading The need for a code of practice for mosquito management in European wetlands

Field research and ecosystem management also suffer in pandemics – but there are glimmers of hope

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues Ecological Solutions and Evidence Lead Editor, Holly Jones, addresses the impact of the pandemic on ecosystems and the people that research and manage them. Long-term datasets with at least a year gap. Graduate students left wondering if they’ll have enough data to graduate on time. Advanced PhD students and post-docs left in a tailspin of uncertainty regarding job prospects. Early … Continue reading Field research and ecosystem management also suffer in pandemics – but there are glimmers of hope

Applied ecology in times of COVID-19

In these unusual and, often challenging times, Journal of Applied Ecology Senior Editor, Martin Nuñez raises the questions of how COVID-19 could influence the direction of, and priorities in, applied ecological research.  SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19 have drastically changed our lives and routines – as I write this, my two-year-old is desperate for me to make her a cheese empanada out of playdoh. Aside from the … Continue reading Applied ecology in times of COVID-19

Coalescing global expertise for global problems: thoughts from the Davos World Biodiversity Forum

Last month, Davos hosted the first World Biodiversity Forum, bringing together representatives from different sectors to hold a conversation about the future of biodiversity around the world. Marc Cadotte, Chair of Applied Ecology Resources (AER) and Editor-in-Chief of Ecological Solutions and Evidence (ESE), shares his thoughts and experiences from the inaugural event. Global discussions around pandemics and economic downturn garner immense attention from governments and … Continue reading Coalescing global expertise for global problems: thoughts from the Davos World Biodiversity Forum

Harvesting the benefits of the open science era in applied ecology  

From open data to preregistration of hypotheses, Erlend Nilsen and colleagues ask how can we make the most of open science in applied ecology? Take a look at this introduction to their recent Commentary and share your thoughts in the comments below. A world in rapid change The world around us is changing rapidly, and much of the research reported through Journal of Applied Ecology is, in … Continue reading Harvesting the benefits of the open science era in applied ecology  

12 months in ecology

Ahead of her plenary lecture at the BES Annual Meeting next week, Helen Roy, Ecologist at the UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology and People and Nature Associate Editor writes for Relational Thinking and us on her celebration of a year in ecology. If you’re at #BES2019 Helen’s plenary lecture will be at 09.00 am on Friday 13th December. Don’t miss it! Every year I … Continue reading 12 months in ecology

How should we train the next generation of applied ecologists?

Senior Editor, Nathalie Pettorelli, shares her thoughts on higher education and how we can better support future generations of applied ecologists. If you’d like to share your opinion on this matter or have an idea for a follow-up post, leave a comment below or email us. Our world, whether we look at climate, nature, culture or technology, is changing fast. Some of these changes are … Continue reading How should we train the next generation of applied ecologists?

Rewilding needs a conceptual framework. Is the adaptive cycle the answer?

Johan T. du Toit and Nathalie Pettorelli explore the differences between rewilding and restoration. The authors have adapted this post from an article originally shared by ZSL. Rewilding means different things to different people but in applied ecology it is now broadly agreed that the concept means reorganizing, retooling, or regenerating wildness in a degraded ecosystem. Contrary to what many seem to think, rewilding is … Continue reading Rewilding needs a conceptual framework. Is the adaptive cycle the answer?