Large African herbivore diversity is essential in transformed landscapes for conserving dung beetle diversity

In their new study, Pryke, Roets and Samways discuss how a diverse range of large African herbivore species is essential for the conservation of dung beetles within transformed landscapes, and argue that the maintenance of functional diversity outside protected areas requires the inclusion of large mammals in conservation plans. Dung beetles need the dung of large mammals to feed and reproduce. In doing so, they … Continue reading Large African herbivore diversity is essential in transformed landscapes for conserving dung beetle diversity

Hotspots of pest-induced US urban tree death: culprits, impacted tree species, and spatial hotspots

In their latest research Emma J. Hudgins, Frank H. Koch, Mark J. Ambrose, and Brian Leung, discuss the economic implications of pest-induced tree deaths in the US. Urban trees are key to the wellbeing of city dwellers but are at high risk of mortality from insect pests, due to having high rates of exposure to invasive species as enabled by trade, travel, and other human … Continue reading Hotspots of pest-induced US urban tree death: culprits, impacted tree species, and spatial hotspots

Acelerando la sucesión secundaria: uso de árboles tolerantes a la sombra para la restauración del bosque de niebla

Esta publicación de blog también está disponible en inglés aquí. Tarin Toledo-Aceves y sus colegas describen sus últimas investigaciones y la importancia de los árboles tolerantes a la sombra en los proyectos de restauración forestal Las iniciativas de reforestación y restauración comúnmente utilizan especies de árboles pioneras de rápido crecimiento. Sin embargo, un alto número de especies tolerantes a la sombra se encuentran amenazadas por … Continue reading Acelerando la sucesión secundaria: uso de árboles tolerantes a la sombra para la restauración del bosque de niebla

Accelerating secondary succession: using shade-tolerant trees for cloud forest restoration

This blog post is also available in Spanish here. Tarin Toledo-Aceves and colleagues describe their latest research and the importance of shade tolerant trees in forest restoration projects. Reforestation and restoration initiatives commonly use fast-growing pioneer tree species. However, a high number of shade-tolerant species are threatened by deforestation and overharvesting, and unlike pioneer species, they have no seed banks on the ground and are … Continue reading Accelerating secondary succession: using shade-tolerant trees for cloud forest restoration

The surprising connections between deer and the forest canopy

Ungulates place immense consumptive pressure on forest vegetation globally, leaving legacies of reduced biodiversity and simplified vegetative structure. In their latest research, Samuel Reed and colleagues sought to determine whether browse-induced changes occurring early in succession ultimately manifest themselves in the developed forest canopy. Herbivores are incredibly influential around the world and can re-shape entire ecosystems over time. In North American temperate forests, white-tailed deer … Continue reading The surprising connections between deer and the forest canopy

Do birds like African chocolate (farms)?

In their latest research, Jarrett and colleagues report the first in‐depth investigation into avian diversity and community composition in African cocoa farms, by assembling a dataset of 9,566 individual birds caught across 83 sites over 30 years in Southern Cameroon. Cocoa, the primary ingredient in all our beloved chocolate products, is grown across the tropics using a range of agricultural practices. Originating in the understory of … Continue reading Do birds like African chocolate (farms)?

Gypsy moths: Understanding the impact of a dreadful forest pest

In their latest Registered Report, Benjamin Leroy and colleagues outline their methods to review the pathways in which gypsy moth outbreaks, and their subsequent treatment, affect forest ecosystems. To find out more about Registered Reports, read our blog post here. The gypsy moth is a species native to Eurasia and widely considered as one of the most severe pests of temperate forests. The exceptionally voracious … Continue reading Gypsy moths: Understanding the impact of a dreadful forest pest

Editor’s Choice 57:12 – Best-practice forestry management delivers diminishing returns for coral reefs with increased land-clearing

Associate Editor, Dr Kiran Dhanjal-Adams, introduces the December Editor’s Choice paper, which demonstrates that sediment runoff from industrial logging can affect food security and livelihoods in the Solomon Islands. Kolombangara is an island in the Western Province of the Solomon Islands in the South West Pacific. The island harbors a large variety of ecosystems, ranging from mangrove ecosystems at sea level to cloud forest ecosystems along the crater, … Continue reading Editor’s Choice 57:12 – Best-practice forestry management delivers diminishing returns for coral reefs with increased land-clearing

La expansión forestal en la Cuenca Mediterránea: Políticas necesarias para optimizar la resiliencia del paisaje y la provisión de servicios de los ecosistemas

This post is also available in English here Los bosques en la Cuenca Mediterránea poseen altos niveles de biodiversidad y han sido explotados durante milenios, proporcionando servicios de los ecosistemas (SE) esenciales para la sociedad. La multifuncionalidad es una característica de estos socio-ecosistemas en los que los productos y servicios no maderables pueden llegar a ser muy importantes para la sociedad en términos tanto de … Continue reading La expansión forestal en la Cuenca Mediterránea: Políticas necesarias para optimizar la resiliencia del paisaje y la provisión de servicios de los ecosistemas

Spontaneous forest expansion in the Mediterranean basin: Which policy mix maximizes ecosystem service provision and resilience at the landscape level?

In their latest Policy Direction, Varela and colleagues examine ecosystem services and ecosystem disservices of forests in the Mediterranean Basin and the policies influencing forest expansion. This post is also available in Spanish here Forests in the Mediterranean basin have been managed for millennia. They provide key ecosystem services (ES) to society and host within them high levels of biodiversity. Some of them depend on … Continue reading Spontaneous forest expansion in the Mediterranean basin: Which policy mix maximizes ecosystem service provision and resilience at the landscape level?