ESE Editor’s Choice 1:1 – Understanding invasive plant phenology to better protect native island species

Laysan albatrosses amongst a field of golden crownbeard © David Dow Taylor et al.’s recent From Practice article details a case study on Midway Atoll that demonstrates the importance of understanding plant phenology to better control and eradicate non-native species. Lead Editor Carolyn Kurle highlights this article as the inaugural Ecological Solutions and Evidence Editor’s Choice. Invasive species on islands are an enormous problem; largely … Continue reading ESE Editor’s Choice 1:1 – Understanding invasive plant phenology to better protect native island species

Editor’s Choice 56:8 – could periodic fisheries closures become a more mainstream tool in the future?

Associate Editor, Hedley Grantham discusses our August Editor’s Choice article, Optimized fishing through periodically harvested closures by Carvalho et al. Fisheries management, and sustainable marine management more broadly, require an assembly of management strategies to be effective. Two primary fisheries management tools are catch and effort restrictions, which are often not very spatially-specific. In contrast, spatially-explicit permanent fishing closures like no-take marine reserves are an … Continue reading Editor’s Choice 56:8 – could periodic fisheries closures become a more mainstream tool in the future?

Editor’s Choice 56:7: Can agri-environment be successful in a pesticide world?

Executive Editor, Marc Cadotte, provides an insight into the important research of Humann-Guilleminot et al. Their recent article, A nation‐wide survey of neonicotinoid insecticides in agricultural land with implications for agri‐environment schemes, is our July Editor’s Choice. In response to general concerns about the impacts of agricultural activities on native biodiversity and ecosystem health, European jurisdictions have implemented agri-environment schemes that regulate and mitigate agricultural … Continue reading Editor’s Choice 56:7: Can agri-environment be successful in a pesticide world?

Editor’s Choice 56:2 – A trait-based approach for forest ecosystem management

The Editor’s Choice for issue 56:2 is written by Associate Editor, Alex Fajardo.  The selected article, Maintaining ecosystem properties after loss of ash in Great Britain by Louise Hill et al, focuses on the importance of using plant functional traits to predict potential changes to an ecosystem, following the loss of a key species. In their study, Maintaining ecosystem properties after loss of ash in Great … Continue reading Editor’s Choice 56:2 – A trait-based approach for forest ecosystem management

Editor’s Choice 56:1 – If a tree is felled in the forest, does anybody hear?

Investment in post-logging interventions may be the way to show people have heard, and perhaps more importantly, are acting. Jennifer Firn provides our first Editor’s Choice of Volume 56. The selected article is the Review, Actively restoring resilience in selectively logged tropical forests by Gianluca R. Cerullo and David P. Edwards. I think it’s safe to say you would be hard pressed to find an ecologist … Continue reading Editor’s Choice 56:1 – If a tree is felled in the forest, does anybody hear?

Editor’s Choice 55:6 -Disentangling natural vs anthropogenic influences on predation: reducing impacts on sensitive prey

The Editor’s Choice article for issue 55:6 is Broad‐scale occurrence of a subsidized avian predator: Reducing impacts of ravens on sage‐grouse and other sensitive prey by O’Neil et al. Associate Editor Margaret Stanley explains the importance of this paper and the disentanglement of natural and anthropogenic influences. As a researcher who often fixates on invasive predators, the tricky issues associated with natural predation, from native predators that … Continue reading Editor’s Choice 55:6 -Disentangling natural vs anthropogenic influences on predation: reducing impacts on sensitive prey

Editor’s Choice 55:5 – Value of information: when to learn and when to manage in conservation

The Editor’s Choice for issue 55:5 is written by Associate Editor, Hedley Grantham. The selected article is When to monitor and when to act: Value of information theory for multiple management units and limited budgets by Bennett et al. Investment in data can improve our understanding of which management actions provide the greatest cost benefits, where and when. But many management decisions are not based … Continue reading Editor’s Choice 55:5 – Value of information: when to learn and when to manage in conservation

Editor’s Choice 55:4 – Applying ecology to inform plant disease management policy and avoid regulator-grower conflict

The Editor’s Choice for issue 55:4 is written by Senior Editor, Phil Stephens. The selected article is Grower and regulator conflict in management of the citrus disease Huanglongbing in Brazil: A modelling study by Craig et al. Plant disease is already recognised as a major driver of crop yield losses. With a huge proportion of the growing human population’s food intake dependent on a relatively … Continue reading Editor’s Choice 55:4 – Applying ecology to inform plant disease management policy and avoid regulator-grower conflict

How to recover endangered raptor species: the Spanish imperial eagle as a case study

Rounding up our Endangered Species Day series, Miguel Ferrer demonstrates how scientists and managers can work together and succeed in conservation efforts. Ferrer et al.’s paper, Reintroducing endangered raptors: A case study of supplementary feeding and removal of nestlings from wild populations, was our Editor’s Choice article for issue 55:3.  Recently, we published a paper about supplementary feeding of large raptors as a method to increase productivity … Continue reading How to recover endangered raptor species: the Spanish imperial eagle as a case study

Editor’s Choice 55:3 – Targeted supplementary feeding supports reintroduction of endangered raptors

The Editor’s Choice for issue 55:3 is by Associate Editor, Des Thompson. The selected article is Reintroducing endangered raptors: A case study of supplementary feeding and removal of nestlings from wild populations by Miguel Ferrer et al. In his classic book Population Ecology of Raptors (1979), Ian Newton (one of the co-authors of this featured paper) concluded: ‘…in the absence of human intervention almost every aspect of … Continue reading Editor’s Choice 55:3 – Targeted supplementary feeding supports reintroduction of endangered raptors