Chico Mendes Prize 2021: early career practitioner winner announced

We’re excited to announce Alexandro Leverkus as the winner of the 2021 Chico Mendes Prize, celebrating the best Practice Insights article in the journal by an author at the start of their career. Winner: Alexandro Leverkus Research: Enabling conditions for the implementation and conservation outcomes of a private nature reserve About the study Public nature reserves are often the cornerstone of nature conservation but are … Continue reading Chico Mendes Prize 2021: early career practitioner winner announced

Hotspots in the Grid: Avian sensitivity and vulnerability to collision risk from energy infrastructure interactions In Europe and North Africa

A new paper, led by Jethro Gauld from the University of East Anglia and colleagues from across Europe, demonstrates how GPS tracking data can be a powerful tool for identifying areas where birds are most sensitive to new renewable energy development due to collision risks. The transition to zero carbon energy is essential to avoid runaway climate change. As nations strive to achieve their Net … Continue reading Hotspots in the Grid: Avian sensitivity and vulnerability to collision risk from energy infrastructure interactions In Europe and North Africa

Large African herbivore diversity is essential in transformed landscapes for conserving dung beetle diversity

In their new study, Pryke, Roets and Samways discuss how a diverse range of large African herbivore species is essential for the conservation of dung beetles within transformed landscapes, and argue that the maintenance of functional diversity outside protected areas requires the inclusion of large mammals in conservation plans. Dung beetles need the dung of large mammals to feed and reproduce. In doing so, they … Continue reading Large African herbivore diversity is essential in transformed landscapes for conserving dung beetle diversity

Indigenous brigades change the spatial patterns of wildfires, and the influence of climate on fire regimes

In their new study, Oliveira et al. express the importance and value of Indigenous knowledge and Indigenous brigades for the management of increasingly occurring wildfires. Fire has been present in different biomes for millions of years and is a factor that can shape vegetation distribution patterns. However, lately there has been observed a higher frequency of growing wildfires that can cause great impacts on society … Continue reading Indigenous brigades change the spatial patterns of wildfires, and the influence of climate on fire regimes

Riparian reserves protect butterfly communities in selectively logged tropical forest

In their new study, Gabriela Montejo-Kovacevich and colleagues consider whether riparian zones provide biodiversity conservation benefits for Butterflies. Selectively logged tropical forest is now more widespread than old-growth primary forest, except in the Amazon and Papua New Guinea. Logging forests for timber is less devastating for biodiversity than other types of land-use change that are ravaging through tropical regions, such as conversion to agriculture or … Continue reading Riparian reserves protect butterfly communities in selectively logged tropical forest

Impacting habitat connectivity of the endangered Florida panther for the transition to utility‐scale solar energy

In a new study, Leskova and colleagues examined the impacts of utility-scale solar energy (USSE) facility installations on habitat connectivity for Florida Panther within Peninsular Florida. Faced with the challenge of meeting increasing global energy demands and pressure to shift from conventional fossil fuels to renewable energy sources to mitigate climate change, the environmental trade-offs associated with renewable energy’s implementation are becoming increasingly apparent. Unfortunately, … Continue reading Impacting habitat connectivity of the endangered Florida panther for the transition to utility‐scale solar energy

(A) Hodgson’s frogmouth, (B) Gould’s shortwing, (C) Fire-tailed myzornis (Phub Dorji)

The fragile Himalayas and the balancing act!

Ugyen Penjor discusses their latest research, conducted with colleagues Sherub Sherub and Rinzin Jamtsho, which explores the effects of land-use change on the functional and phylogenetic diversity of Eastern Himalayan bird communities. Envision the Himalayas – snow-clad mountains, jagged peaks, ruddy-cheeked people, and of course the ‘Abominable Snowman’ or The Yeti. But what is more exciting about the Himalayas is the biodiversity. The Himalayas can … Continue reading The fragile Himalayas and the balancing act!

Editor’s Choice 59:1: Taking the road less fragmented slows disease spread

Associate Editors, Bret D Elderd and Anibal Pauchard, introduce this month’s Editor’s Choice article by Prist et al., which demonstrates that the building of roads that crisscross pristine habitat can lead to an increase in vector dispersal and Yellow Fever Virus (YFV) cases. The relationship between human and animal disease and environmental integrity has been highlighted by the recent COVID19 pandemic. However, quantitative studies on … Continue reading Editor’s Choice 59:1: Taking the road less fragmented slows disease spread

Community-level responses of African carnivores to prescribed burning

Fires are common in many ecosystems world-wide, and are frequently used as a management tool. Using South African carnivores as their focal community, Laura C. Gigliotti and colleagues explore the relative changes in carnivore intensity of use in post-fire landscapes associated with hypothesized changes in prey availability and top-down suppression. Prescribed burning is a common form of habitat management and assessing wildlife responses to burning is … Continue reading Community-level responses of African carnivores to prescribed burning

Integrating snake distribution, abundance and expert-derived behavioural traits to predict snakebite risk

In their latest research, Martin et al. estimate the spatial patterns of seven snake species from Sri Lanka and combine these estimations with indices of species’ relative abundance, aggressiveness and envenoming severity to test whether these traits explain spatial patterns of snakebite risk. Whenever we go out for a walk to the bush, for holidays to an exotic, desolate and beautiful place, the idea of … Continue reading Integrating snake distribution, abundance and expert-derived behavioural traits to predict snakebite risk