Cameron Hodges: Using radio-telemetry to better understand how a highly venomous snake lives among people

In this Q&A, we ask author Cameron Hodges about his team’s research monitoring the behaviour of a Malayan krait near a university dormitory in Thailand, and find out a little bit more about the author himself. Go to: The research | The bigger picture | About the Author The research What’s your article about? Our article provides a detailed description of the observed movements, habitat … Continue reading Cameron Hodges: Using radio-telemetry to better understand how a highly venomous snake lives among people

Repatriating solitary felids: the case for seeking homes for conflict-borne leopards in southern Africa

Photo © Vasti Botha Translocating large carnivores to reduce human-wildlife conflict have historically failed, but recent improvements in satellite technology have enabled better monitoring and success. In their latest research, Power et al. report on the outcomes of repatriating 16 leopards across a South African province. Leopards need little introduction. These large felids are ubiquitous across Africa and large parts of Asia. However, being so … Continue reading Repatriating solitary felids: the case for seeking homes for conflict-borne leopards in southern Africa

Editor’s Choice 58:3 Eagle fatalities are reduced by automated curtailment of wind turbines

Journal of Applied Ecology’s March Editor’s Choice tests the efficacy of an automated curtailment system in reducing counts of fatalities of eagles. Associate Editor, Kulbhushansingh Suryawanshi, introduces the selected article by Chris J W McClure, which shows that this method substantially reduced eagle fatalities, offering potential opportunities to lessen the conflict between wind energy and raptor conservation. We need greener renewable energy to fight climate … Continue reading Editor’s Choice 58:3 Eagle fatalities are reduced by automated curtailment of wind turbines

Smaller adults and bigger juveniles: how global warming is affecting our fish populations.

There is mounting evidence that climate change is affecting commercial fish species. In their latest research, Ikpewe and colleagues investigate the effect of temperature on fish sizes in two neighbouring regions, displaying contrasting trends in warming. The warming of our oceans due to climate change is affecting marine life in numerous ways.  Fish populations, in particular, are experiencing changes in productivity, distribution, growth and the … Continue reading Smaller adults and bigger juveniles: how global warming is affecting our fish populations.

Behind the cover 2:1 – Q&A with David O’Brien

In this Q&A, we find out more about the author and research: “A co‐development approach to conservation leads to informed habitat design and rapid establishment of amphibian communities” behind the cover image of our first issue of 2021. The research What’s your article about? Our article describes habitat creation and management for amphibians in economically active sites. We worked with farmers, foresters and a golf … Continue reading Behind the cover 2:1 – Q&A with David O’Brien

Combining seascape connectivity with cumulative impact assessment to support ecosystem‐based marine spatial planning

Cumulative impact assessment (CIA) is a simple yet promising approach to guide marine management interventions, but one not without limitations. Jonsson and colleagues report a novel method which combines CIA with seascape connectivity to account for remote effects of local environmental impact. Human activities are having a catostrphic impact on ocean biodiversity, meaning effective policies and management actions are needed to facilitate the sustainable use … Continue reading Combining seascape connectivity with cumulative impact assessment to support ecosystem‐based marine spatial planning

Least‐cost path analysis for urban greenways planning: A test with moths and birds across two habitats and two cities

Urbanization is a major threat to biodiversity. In a new paper, Balbi and colleagues test the efficiency and ecological validity of least-cost path modelling in predicting effective corridors in urban environments. Urban biodiversity contributes to global biodiversity conservation and provides multiple ecosystem services. The growth of human populations living in urban environments and the associated expansion of urbanized land therefore means that conserving urban biodiversity … Continue reading Least‐cost path analysis for urban greenways planning: A test with moths and birds across two habitats and two cities

Predictive modeling of raptor movement can minimise the impact of wind energy developments

Energy generation is shifting towards renewable sources, but how do these developments impact our environment? In their latest research, Megan Murgatroyd and colleagues develop a predictive model to guide where best to locate wind turbines to minimize collision risk for a large soaring raptor. The sight of a wind farm is no longer strange to us. For some they might be seen as gentle giants, … Continue reading Predictive modeling of raptor movement can minimise the impact of wind energy developments

Editor’s Choice 57:11 – An integrated approach using passive acoustic monitors and camera traps to measure hunting activity and its impacts on mammalian populations

Associate Editor, Sharif A. Mukul, introduces the November Editor’s Choice paper, which demonstrates that acoustic monitoring technologies detect far more instances of hunting than camera traps. Unsustainable hunting is one of the major challenges to wildlife and healthy forests worldwide. While subsistence hunting is widespread in many parts of the tropics, over-hunting can have a detrimental effect on wildlife populations, particularly mammals. In recent years, … Continue reading Editor’s Choice 57:11 – An integrated approach using passive acoustic monitors and camera traps to measure hunting activity and its impacts on mammalian populations

Trembling in the Balance: My life as a Black ecologist

For Black History Month, the British Ecological Society (BES) journals are celebrating the work of Black ecologists from around the world and sharing their stories. Christian Asante, a fifth year doctoral student at Boston College, shares his story below. I was born and raised in a sprawling urban neighbourhood in Ghana. My first awareness of nature as a child was birds flying headlong into my … Continue reading Trembling in the Balance: My life as a Black ecologist