Is invasion success explained by enemy release?

The cover for Journal of Applied Ecology issue 57:06 shows a Cuban treefrog in Florida, USA. Discussing the research behind the image, Elizabeth Roznik explains how invasive species such as this can outcompete native frogs due to their large body sizes, fast growth rates, and tolerance of parasites.

Invasive species are among the leading threats to native wildlife. Understanding the mechanisms underlying invasions can help us manage invasive species and their impacts. Continue reading Is invasion success explained by enemy release?

How can control of invading plant pathogens increase their rate of spread? How can we prevent it?

Ryan Sharp and colleagues investigate the answers to both of these questions and discuss their recent work, The effect of competition on the control of invading plant pathogens, published in Journal of Applied Ecology.

When pathogens invade into an area, they may find themselves in competition with already endemic pathogen strains. This competition can severely limit the spread of the invader. Control methods generally do not distinguish between pathogen strains. Therefore, when control is applied, both invasive and endemic strains are affected. Continue reading How can control of invading plant pathogens increase their rate of spread? How can we prevent it?

Using phenology to guide invasive plant management

Successful restoration of degraded land often depends on well-timed interventions to control invasive species. In their recently published article, Taylor and colleagues present a case study of the effects of incorporating phenology information into invasive plant control operations at Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), USA. The authors share their story below. Towards the end of April, millions of birds, including warblers, tanagers, buntings, grosbeaks … Continue reading Using phenology to guide invasive plant management

Cover stories: escapes from aquaculture

Using the example of sturgeons in the Yangtze River and impacts on the critically endangered Chinese sturgeon, work by Rui-Ting Ju et al. looks into policies around escaping non-native species from aquaculture. The corresponding cover image for issue 57:01 was taken by Ping Zhuang. Sturgeon farming is expanding worldwide due to the overexploitation of wild stocks. In China, the main farmed species are non-native species … Continue reading Cover stories: escapes from aquaculture

Private boats in the Mediterranean have extremely high potential to spread alien species

British Ecological Society press release A Mediterranean-wide study has found that 71% of sampled recreational boats hosted alien marine species. Over half carried an alien species that was not yet present in the marina the boat was visiting. The research is published in the British Ecological Society Journal of Applied Ecology. This is the first study in the Mediterranean to combine boat and marina sampling data … Continue reading Private boats in the Mediterranean have extremely high potential to spread alien species

eDNA snapshots of invasion, infection and extinction from a freshwater crayfish tragedy

For the first time, a devastating crayfish plague outbreak has been monitored from the onset to crayfish extinction using eDNA methodology. David A. Strand and colleagues surveyed a watercourse over three years and discovered a remarkable correlation between eDNA fluctuations and host-pathogen dynamics. Noble crayfish (Astacus astacus) are macroinvertebrates that can be found in both lotic and lentic freshwater systems across most of Europe. Previously … Continue reading eDNA snapshots of invasion, infection and extinction from a freshwater crayfish tragedy

Issue 55:5

Read the highlights from our September issue. Value of information: when to learn and when to manage in conservation This issue’s Editor’s Choice article Better many small than a few large: how landscape configuration affects arthropod communities in rice Can splitting agricultural ecosystems help reduce yield losses for rice farmers? Mejor muchos pequeños que pocos grandes: sobre como la configuración del paisaje afecta las comunidades … Continue reading Issue 55:5

Identifying lurking garden invaders promoted by climate change

In our changing climates, some introduced ornamental plant species could establish themselves and become invasive. Emily Haeuser and colleagues present a new model for helping assess naturalization risk in their article, European ornamental garden flora as an invasion debt under climate change. Invasive species can cause significant ecological and economic damage worldwide. They can disrupt ecosystem services, and put threatened and endangered species at risk … Continue reading Identifying lurking garden invaders promoted by climate change

Prevendo as próximas espécies invasoras

By Associate Editor, Rafael Zenni  An English version of this post is available here. Milhares de espécies de plantas foram movidas para além das suas áreas de ocorrência nativas para fins ornamentais. As escolhas de espécies para jardins, ruas e parques urbanos são baseadas em grande parte em razões estéticas, culturais e utilitárias e não por sua adequação ecológica ou climática para uma região específica. … Continue reading Prevendo as próximas espécies invasoras

Predicting future invaders in Europe

As our climate warms non-native plant species, introduced for their aesthetic appeal, have the potential to naturalize. Associate Editor, Rafael Zenni discusses research by Emily Haeuser and colleagues that aims to manage this risk. European ornamental garden flora as an invasion debt under climate change is published in Journal of Applied Ecology. A Portuguese version of this post is available here. Thousands of plant species have been … Continue reading Predicting future invaders in Europe