12 months in ecology

Ahead of her plenary lecture at the BES Annual Meeting next week, Helen Roy, Ecologist at the UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology and People and Nature Associate Editor writes for Relational Thinking and us on her celebration of a year in ecology. If you’re at #BES2019 Helen’s plenary lecture will be at 09.00 am on Friday 13th December. Don’t miss it! Every year I … Continue reading 12 months in ecology

How should we train the next generation of applied ecologists?

Senior Editor, Nathalie Pettorelli, shares her thoughts on higher education and how we can better support future generations of applied ecologists. If you’d like to share your opinion on this matter or have an idea for a follow-up post, leave a comment below or email us. Our world, whether we look at climate, nature, culture or technology, is changing fast. Some of these changes are … Continue reading How should we train the next generation of applied ecologists?

Rewilding needs a conceptual framework. Is the adaptive cycle the answer?

Johan T. du Toit and Nathalie Pettorelli explore the differences between rewilding and restoration. The authors have adapted this post from an article originally shared by ZSL. Rewilding means different things to different people but in applied ecology it is now broadly agreed that the concept means reorganizing, retooling, or regenerating wildness in a degraded ecosystem. Contrary to what many seem to think, rewilding is … Continue reading Rewilding needs a conceptual framework. Is the adaptive cycle the answer?

Conservation optimism: applied ecologists lead the way

Linking to their upcoming summit in Oxford, UK, Conservation Optimism’s E.J. Milner-Gulland brings together a selection of recent research papers that celebrate conservation success and look for solutions. These are both difficult and hopeful times for applied ecologists. On the one hand, the scale and severity of the strain that our ecological systems are under is becoming more and more apparent; a look through the … Continue reading Conservation optimism: applied ecologists lead the way

Busy practitioner? Think carefully before choosing which academic conference to attend

With conference season upon us, Errol Douwes (Environmental Planning and Climate Protection, Durban) shares advice on how to make the most of the academic conference circuit from a practitioner’s perspective. What tips do you have? Leave a comment below or Tweet us @JAppliedEcology. I’ve often wondered if and how other practitioners decide on which conferences they will attend. It’s very seldom that I’ve been invited … Continue reading Busy practitioner? Think carefully before choosing which academic conference to attend

Can living shorelines survive the rising seas?

Take a sneak preview into our new issue, which publishes this Friday and turns the Spotlight on conservation in marine habitats. The feature includes a Practitioner’s Perspective on designing climate‐resilient living shorelines, which Molly Mitchell and Donna Marie Bilkovic discuss here. Look out for an additional post bringing together all the papers in the Spotlight soon. Living shorelines are a form of shoreline protection that mimics … Continue reading Can living shorelines survive the rising seas?

How will climate change impact rangelands in the next few decades?

Philip Thornton (CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS)) contributed a chapter to Grasslands and Climate Change, the latest volume of the Ecological Reviews series. In this post Philip tells us more about the chapter, which explains the impacts of climate change on open grasslands used for livestock grazing. There is considerable uncertainty regarding the effects of climate change on rangelands, not … Continue reading How will climate change impact rangelands in the next few decades?

On the horizon: omega-3 fatty acids in oil crops – saving fish or threatening insects?

An emerging genetic technology that makes oilseed crops produce omega-3 fatty acids promises health and sustainability benefits, but there’s a potential adverse impact on insects that hardly anyone is talking about. Lynn Dicks and Xavier Le Roux round off our ‘On the horizon’ series. Polyunsaturated, long chain omega-3 fatty acids are the reason why healthy diet recommendations usually include seafood and oily fish like salmon, … Continue reading On the horizon: omega-3 fatty acids in oil crops – saving fish or threatening insects?

Creating platforms for community participation in the design of multifunctional landscapes

Integrating social and ecological science to develop landscape-focused solutions to environmental problems, Osiman Mabhachi shares the story of a project supported by the British Ecological Society’s Ecologists in Africa grant. Rural communities across Africa connect to landscapes in diverse and complex ways, and communities’ dependence on natural resources found in landscapes is well-documented. As with other continents, African landscapes are undergoing transformations primarily driven by … Continue reading Creating platforms for community participation in the design of multifunctional landscapes

On the horizon: Food for the future – regulating gene-edited plants

Could gene-edited plants provide better food security? And what are the risks and potential consequences presented by this process? Helen Doran (Senior Specialist, Futures, Natural England) explores these questions in the latest instalment to our ‘On the horizon’ series. ‘Imagine that a cheap, easy-to-use, and rapidly deployable technology could make crops more fertile and strengthen their resistance to threats such as climate change and disease’ … Continue reading On the horizon: Food for the future – regulating gene-edited plants