Ancient woodland restoration

In this post Beth Atkinson discusses her recent paper ‘A comparison of clearfelling and gradual thinning of plantations for the restoration of insect herbivores and woodland plants’ Forests are valued across the globe for their history and heritage, as well as their importance for biodiversity. They display their historical use, for example through coppice stools, and are evocative like perhaps no other habitat, conjuring images … Continue reading Ancient woodland restoration

Exotic trees at risk of native insect attack

In this post, Manuela Branco talks about her recent paper “Host range expansion of native insects to exotic trees increases with area of introduction and the presence of congeneric native trees” Also, see Manuela’s cartoon illustrating how host range expansion of native insects to exotic trees increases with area of introduction and the presence of congeneric native trees Exotic tree species are used worldwide for planting, … Continue reading Exotic trees at risk of native insect attack

When it comes to reforestation, impacts on seedling growth from competition, herbivory and land-use legacy may be as predictable as a game of Rock-Paper-Scissors

Species interactions are the foundations of ecological science. As early as pre-school, we begin building food webs and discussing the basic principles of species survival and interactions between living and non-living parts of an ecosystem. We know herbivores eat plants and prefer ‘tasty’ ones; plants compete for light, nutrients, water and space; and historical land management impacts on future actions. What we still don’t know … Continue reading When it comes to reforestation, impacts on seedling growth from competition, herbivory and land-use legacy may be as predictable as a game of Rock-Paper-Scissors