Large African herbivore diversity is essential in transformed landscapes for conserving dung beetle diversity

In their new study, Pryke, Roets and Samways discuss how a diverse range of large African herbivore species is essential for the conservation of dung beetles within transformed landscapes, and argue that the maintenance of functional diversity outside protected areas requires the inclusion of large mammals in conservation plans. Dung beetles need the dung of large mammals to feed and reproduce. In doing so, they … Continue reading Large African herbivore diversity is essential in transformed landscapes for conserving dung beetle diversity

Editor’s Choice 56:5 – diverse communities of dung beetles and soil microbiota promote food safety

Associate Editor, Bret Elderd explains the importance of insects and microbes in decreasing risks to humans from pathogens such as E. coli. and discusses issue 56:5’s Editor’s Choice article, Organic farming promotes biotic resistance to foodborne human pathogens by Jones et al. Outbreaks of food poisoning, whether due to Escherichia coli (E. coli) or other food-borne pathogens continually pop-up in the news at what seems … Continue reading Editor’s Choice 56:5 – diverse communities of dung beetles and soil microbiota promote food safety

Measuring the success of reforestation for restoring biodiversity and ecosystem functioning

This blog post discusses a recent paper by Mia Derhé, ‘Measuring the success of reforestation for restoring biodiversity and ecosystem functioning‘. Restoring rainforests: Recovering both biodiversity and ecosystem functioning Rapid anthropogenic forest change means that many countries are now running out of large areas of primary forest and so the future of tropical forest biodiversity depends more than ever on the effective management and restoration … Continue reading Measuring the success of reforestation for restoring biodiversity and ecosystem functioning