Getting on with interviews

This piece is written by Heather Crump, Aberystwyth University, BES Conservation Ecology SIG Early Career Representative @hec72012. It has also been posted on the BES and ZSL Wild Science blogs. Many doors can open as a result of a PhD, whether they lead to continued research, lectureships or work with a non-governmental organisation; none are to be left unexplored. However, finding the key to open … Continue reading Getting on with interviews

The nuances of networking and the crux of the CV

This piece is written by Lydia Cole, Rezatec, BES Conservation Ecology SIG Liaison Officer @lydcole. It has also been posted on the BES and ZSL Wild Science blogs. “Who enjoys networking?” Silence. And then we all hear the news: our first task is a game, which consists in spending 20 minutes networking our very hardest.  The rule is simple: the winner of the ‘competition’ is … Continue reading The nuances of networking and the crux of the CV

Publicising your work to support your career aspirations

This piece is written by Katherine Baldock NERC Knowledge Exchange Fellow, University of Bristol, BES Conservation SIG early career rep @Kath_Baldock This blog has also been posted on the BES and ZSL Wild Science blogs. Publicising your research and learning to communicate with a range of audiences is key to raising your profile as a researcher, especially in the early career stages when you may … Continue reading Publicising your work to support your career aspirations

Writing successful grant applications: power in numbers

This piece is written by Claudia Gray, ZSL, BES Conservation SIG Communications Officer and has also been posted on the BES and ZSL Wild Science blogs. To contribute successfully to biodiversity conservation, you will almost certainly have to get money from somewhere. Your salary, your research assistants, your equipment, any engagement with stakeholders and ultimately the conservation of your focal habitat or species are likely … Continue reading Writing successful grant applications: power in numbers

Fledging the nest: an early career event for the next generation of Conservation Ecologists

This piece is written by Lydia Cole, Rezatec, BES Conservation Ecology SIG Liaison Officer @lydcole, Katherine Baldock, University of Bristol, BES Conservation Ecology SIG Early Career Rep @Kath_Baldock, Claudia Gray, Zoological Society of London, BES Conservation Ecology SIG Communications Officer @ClaudiaLGray, Heather Crump, Aberystwyth University, BES Conservation Ecology SIG Early Career Rep @hec72012 This blog has also been posted on the BES and ZSL Wild … Continue reading Fledging the nest: an early career event for the next generation of Conservation Ecologists

Writing scientific articles in the era of the search engine: gonna change my way of thinking

In this post Senior Editor Phil Stephens discusses what he learnt about search engine optimization in a workshop at the BES annual meeting 2015. As a green and eternally juvenile PhD student at the end of the last millennium, I was delighted with the directive – from one of the group’s postdocs[1] – to lace my first presentation at the British Ecological Society’s annual meeting … Continue reading Writing scientific articles in the era of the search engine: gonna change my way of thinking

Is policy too important to leave to decision makers? The case of the Infrastructure Bill

By Sarah Durant, Institute of Zoology In April, the Zoological Society of London together with the British Ecological Society organised a one day symposium, entitled “ The Conservation Science Policy/Interface: Challenges and Opportunities”. Acting as the launch event for the BES’s revitalised Conservation Special Interest Group, the symposium brought together over 150 scientists, conservationists and policy-makers to explore how the links between science and policy … Continue reading Is policy too important to leave to decision makers? The case of the Infrastructure Bill

Culling badgers to control cattle tuberculosis – a black and white issue?

Last month, the Zoological Society of London together with the British Ecological Society organised a one day symposium, entitled “ The Conservation Science Policy/Interface: Challenges and Opportunities”. Acting as the launch event for the BES’s revitalised Conservation Special Interest Group, the symposium brought together over 150 scientists, conservationists and policy-makers to explore how the links between science and policy can be strengthened. Among the speakers … Continue reading Culling badgers to control cattle tuberculosis – a black and white issue?