When stressed by both pesticides and parasites, honey bees do better than expected

In their latest research, Bird and colleagues perform a meta‐analysis to gain a clearer view of the combined effects of parasites and pesticides on honey bee health. Honey bees pollinate about a third of all crops. Without them, the production of everything from almonds to zucchinis would grind to halt, which makes it especially alarming that honey bees have being dying at increasing rates over … Continue reading When stressed by both pesticides and parasites, honey bees do better than expected

Is invasion success explained by enemy release?

The cover for Journal of Applied Ecology issue 57:06 shows a Cuban treefrog in Florida, USA. Discussing the research behind the image, Elizabeth Roznik explains how invasive species such as this can outcompete native frogs due to their large body sizes, fast growth rates, and tolerance of parasites.

Invasive species are among the leading threats to native wildlife. Understanding the mechanisms underlying invasions can help us manage invasive species and their impacts. Continue reading Is invasion success explained by enemy release?