Ever wondered how Senior Editors feel when they have a manuscript rejected? Or who inspired them as students? Find out in our Meet the Editor series. First up this week is Jos Barlow.

JosWhat can you tell us about the first paper you published?

It was submitted by post in triplicate, and I heard nothing for six months. When I followed up, the apologetic editor said he’d lost it under the paper on their desk. I’m glad we’ve moved on as i’d be even worse!

What’s your favourite species and why?

Difficult one, but I think it’d be any of the trumpeter species (Psophia spp.), all of which are endemic to the Amazon region. They are group living, noisy and a lot of fun – somehow they just make you feel good!

Who inspired you most as a student?

The other students, especially those who had a seemingly innate knowledge of natural history. I learned so much from them.

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Jos is quite happy the manuscript submission process is handled online these days!

If you could wake up tomorrow with a new skill, what would it be?

That’s a tie between singing in tune, dancing in time, and advanced mathematics! I’d settle for being slightly better in all three.

Are you a good cook? What’s your signature dish?

Any kind of pasta with the leftovers from the fridge

Please share a [funny] story about a paper you had rejected.

Wow, too many to tell – but looking back, the reviewers were mostly fair.

What was the first album you owned?

Not sure –  but it would have been reggae, and I probably stole it from my brother.

If any fictional character could join your lab, who would it be and why?

Some more non-fictional ones would be good!

How many British Ecological Society Annual Meetings have you attended? Which one was the best?

Leeds stands out as it was my first.

Are you attending #BES2018? If so, when is the best opportunity for people to meet you?

Yes –  at the BES stand

Jos Barlow is a Professor in conservation science at Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, UK. Jos’ research examines biodiversity responses to environmental change in tropical ecosystems. It aims to understand how human-dominated tropical forest landscapes can be managed to conserve biodiversity and ecosystem services, while maintaining the livelihoods of rural peoples. He has worked on a wide range of taxa, and has studied ecological issues in many different management systems, including selectively logged native forests, agroforests, fast-growing timber plantations, slash-and-burn, cattle ranching and mechanised agriculture.

Meet more of our Editors here:

Marc Cadotte

Nathalie Pettorelli

Martin Nuñez

Phil Stephens