Microclimate determines transplantation success

Associate Editor, Pieter De Frenne (Ghent University, Belgium) discusses assisted migration, climate change and the recent article by Brooker et al. Tiny niches and translocations: the challenge of identifying suitable recipient sites for small and immobile species. One of the key outstanding issues in applied ecology is to better inform land managers and policy makers how to adapt to climate change. Many species are currently shifting their … Continue reading Microclimate determines transplantation success

Vaccinating badgers against TB does not change their behaviour

In this post, Rosie Woodroffe discusses her paper “Ranging behaviour of badgers Meles meles vaccinated with Bacillus Calmette Guerin”, published today in Journal of Applied Ecology. Badgergeddon! That’s how one of Britain’s national newspapers described the ongoing cull of badgers, intended to curb the spread of bovine tuberculosis (TB) to cattle. The culls are highly controversial. Farmers clamour for decisive action to control a disease … Continue reading Vaccinating badgers against TB does not change their behaviour

A new look at an old problem: Measuring the importance of dispersal in human-impacted systems

In this post Angela Strecker discusses the recent paper ‘A fresh approach reveals how dispersal shapes metacommunity structure in a human-altered landscape‘, by Barbara Downes, Jill Lancaster, Alena Glaister and William Bovill. One of the largest challenges that ecologists face is understanding the importance of dispersal across patches in ecosystems.  In the process of dispersal, organisms move to different habitats, allowing them to potentially escape … Continue reading A new look at an old problem: Measuring the importance of dispersal in human-impacted systems

Crucial for population management: new model solves old missing data problem and provides mortality estimates for male African lions

In this post Julia Barthold discusses the recent paper “Bayesian estimates of male and female African lion mortality for future use in population management” by her and co-authors A. J. Loveridge, D.W. Macdonald, C. Packer, and F. Colchero. The article is part of the BES cross-journal special feature “Demography Beyond the Population”. In 2013, I wanted to project the population dynamics of African lions. This … Continue reading Crucial for population management: new model solves old missing data problem and provides mortality estimates for male African lions

Costs of passive dispersal in fragmented landscapes

In this post, Brittany Teller (@brittzinator) describes her recent paper with co- authors Adam Miller & Katriona Shea “Conservation of passively dispersed organisms in the context of habitat degradation and destruction“ Leaving the natal location (hereafter, “dispersal”) can be a critical part of many species’ life cycles. If dispersing individuals help establish new populations, this colonization can help keep connected metapopulations viable in the face of disturbances … Continue reading Costs of passive dispersal in fragmented landscapes

Eyes in the sky see the secrets of the sea

This guest post is by Kylie L. Scales (@KylieScales) on her recent review paper “On the Front Line: frontal zones as priority at-sea conservation areas for mobile marine vertebrates.” The oceans may seem like Earth’s last remaining wilderness, but are in fact teeming with human activity as a result of intense and growing demand for marine resources. Consequently, large marine vertebrates such as seabirds, turtles, … Continue reading Eyes in the sky see the secrets of the sea

Pine Fiction: communicating research to a wider audience

Pine Fiction –a three minute stop-motion video by Alessio Mortelliti and Christina Thwaites. The aim of our video was to present the results of a relatively complex scientific study to a wider audience (to scientists and non-scientists) and to bring attention to the paper “Experimental evaluation shows limited influence of pine plantations on the connectivity of highly fragmented bird populations” by Alessio Mortelliti, Martin J. … Continue reading Pine Fiction: communicating research to a wider audience