We may be underestimating the negative impacts of logging on the biodiversity of tropical forests

In this post Filipe França & Hannah Griffiths discuss their recent paper ’Do space-for-time assessments underestimate the impacts of logging on tropical biodiversity? An Amazonian case study using dung beetles The difficulty in developing strong researcher-practitioner relationships is a central ‘stumbling block’ in conservation science. Unfortunately this means that more often than not the policy implications of ecological research don’t reach the people responsible for … Continue reading We may be underestimating the negative impacts of logging on the biodiversity of tropical forests

Comparing the responses of functional redundancy and functional diversity indices to stress

In this post Daniel Bruno discusses his paper ‘Impacts of environmental filters on functional redundancy in riparian vegetation’ The world’s ecosystems are experiencing an unprecedented increase in the amount and variety of impacts (global change) which is leading to an unprecedented biodiversity loss and modification of ecosystem functioning (e.g. changes in primary production, pollination, nutrient cycling and organic matter decomposition). Accordingly, there is a long-standing … Continue reading Comparing the responses of functional redundancy and functional diversity indices to stress

Do we have a clue about the role of wildlife in antimicrobial resistance dynamics?

In this post, Marion Vittecoq discusses her Review paper published today in Journal of Applied Ecology ‘Antimicrobial resistance in wildlife‘ A crucial issue Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) spread is of major concern for human health and associated with growing economical issues. While it is increasingly hypothesized that wildlife could play an important role in antimicrobial-resistant bacteria (AMRB) dynamics, empirical data remain scarce at the moment. Nevertheless … Continue reading Do we have a clue about the role of wildlife in antimicrobial resistance dynamics?

Flower strips support ecosystem services only when they have the right flowers

In this post Paul van Rijn discusses his recent paper ‘Nectar accessibility determines fitness, flower choice and abundance of hoverflies that provide natural pest control’ The industrialization of agriculture has strongly impoverished our countryside. The amount and quality of non-crop habitats have declined, and the biodiversity within and among crops has dropped even more. In recent years it has become clear that this not only … Continue reading Flower strips support ecosystem services only when they have the right flowers

Managing species and reducing human–wildlife conflicts

This blog post is part of the blog series ‘Authors in Asia’, to accompany the recent Virtual Issue in Journal of Applied Ecology. You can read other posts in this series here. This post features three manuscripts which look at reducing human–wildlife conflicts and managing species. First, Toshifumi Minamoto discusses his paper ‘A basin-scale application of environmental DNA assessment for rare endemic species and closely … Continue reading Managing species and reducing human–wildlife conflicts

Forest cover change in the Greater Mekong sub-region

This blog post is part of the blog series ‘Authors in Asia’, to accompany the recent Virtual Issue in Journal of Applied Ecology. You can read other posts in this series here. Minerva Singh is a PhD Candidate at the University of Cambridge and she is involved with the BES Conservation Ecology Special Interest Group. Her research focuses on using high resolution airborne data for … Continue reading Forest cover change in the Greater Mekong sub-region

Can we make ski slopes less damaging to the environment?

In this post, Associate Editor Nathalie Butt discusses a recent paper by Jennifer Burt and Jeffrey Clary Initial disturbance intensity affects recovery rates and successional divergence on abandoned ski slopes Fragile habitats Montane or alpine ecosystems are among the most fragile we have, and they are therefore places where human impact can be very damaging. Of course we are attracted to these beautiful snow-covered mountains … Continue reading Can we make ski slopes less damaging to the environment?

Managing invasive species in a warming Arctic

In this post Associate Editor Joseph Bennett discusses a paper he recently handled by Chris Ware and colleagues ‘Biological introduction risks from shipping in a warming Arctic’ It is well known that the Arctic is one of the most vulnerable regions to the impacts of climate change (IPCC 2014). Climate change will not only have direct impacts, it will also magnify the effects of existing … Continue reading Managing invasive species in a warming Arctic

Restoration of a heavily degraded ecosystem

In this post Associate Editor David Moreno Mateos discusses a paper he recently handled by Andrea Borkenhagen and David Cooper ‘Creating fen initiation conditions: a new approach for peatland reclamation in the oil sands region of Alberta Go to Google Earth and adjust the screen so you can see the whole of North America from about 7,000 km from the ground. You will see Alberta, … Continue reading Restoration of a heavily degraded ecosystem

The importance of small patches of habitat for conservation

In this post Associate Editor Akira Mori discusses a paper he recently handled by Ayesha Tulloch and colleagues ‘Understanding the importance of small patches of habitat for conservation’ Landscape perspectives are important for land management in human-modified ecosystems, and the related development of land-clearing policy. Informed by a large body of macroecological theory and field research, scientists as well as practitioners have long discussed and … Continue reading The importance of small patches of habitat for conservation