Taming the wild uncertainty of a multi-species reintroduction project

Reintroduction projects are becoming more complex, often involving the translocation of multiple species. In their latest research, Peterson and colleagues use ensembles of ecosystem models to compare 23 alternative reintroduction strategies on Dirk Hartog Island in Western Australia  The idea of “rewilding” has gained popularity worldwide, and there is an interesting dialogue at play around the meaning of the term – some may allude to “playing … Continue reading Taming the wild uncertainty of a multi-species reintroduction project

Can we save a migratory vulture population with captive-raised birds?

A new study by Steffen Oppel and colleagues shows that supporting a declining population of a migratory vulture with captive-reared young birds every year could delay extinction, and thus afford conservationists more time to reduce lethal threats along a migratory flyway spanning three continents. Since biblical times people have entertained the concept that animals could be saved from extinction in a man-made sanctuary. The concept … Continue reading Can we save a migratory vulture population with captive-raised birds?

Cameron Hodges: Using radio-telemetry to better understand how a highly venomous snake lives among people

In this Q&A, we ask author Cameron Hodges about his team’s research monitoring the behaviour of a Malayan krait near a university dormitory in Thailand, and find out a little bit more about the author himself. Go to: The research | The bigger picture | About the Author The research What’s your article about? Our article provides a detailed description of the observed movements, habitat … Continue reading Cameron Hodges: Using radio-telemetry to better understand how a highly venomous snake lives among people

Repatriating solitary felids: the case for seeking homes for conflict-borne leopards in southern Africa

Photo © Vasti Botha Translocating large carnivores to reduce human-wildlife conflict have historically failed, but recent improvements in satellite technology have enabled better monitoring and success. In their latest research, Power et al. report on the outcomes of repatriating 16 leopards across a South African province. Leopards need little introduction. These large felids are ubiquitous across Africa and large parts of Asia. However, being so … Continue reading Repatriating solitary felids: the case for seeking homes for conflict-borne leopards in southern Africa

How are these elephants doing 35 years after being reintroduced as under-5s? The Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park story

In 1981, after nearly 100 years of absence, the first elephants were reintroduced to the Hluhluwe-iMfolozi region of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Remarkably, all 200 elephants reintroduced over the next 15 years were juveniles (around 2-5 years of age). The new paper by Tim Kuiper, and Dave and Heleen Druce, Demography and social dynamics of an African elephant population 35 years after reintroduction as juveniles, shows how this unusual … Continue reading How are these elephants doing 35 years after being reintroduced as under-5s? The Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park story

Issue 55:2

Issue 55:2 includes a Spotlight on Decision making under uncertainty. Other topics include urban ecology, population monitoring, tropical forest restoration and more. Here we take a look at some of the articles published in this issue. Decision making under uncertainty Senior Editor, Michael Bode on this issue’s selection of Spotlight papers How does grazing by wild ungulates and livestock affect plant richness? This issue’s Editor’s Choice Jaguar … Continue reading Issue 55:2

Tiny translocations study has BIG message

Last week, Associate Editor, Pieter De Frenne commented on the article Tiny niches and translocations: the challenge of identifying suitable recipient sites for small and immobile species. By Brooker et al. Now the authors share their thoughts on the well-debated topic of translocation. Climate change and its effects on some species has sparked a debate among scientists about whether moving species to more suitable places … Continue reading Tiny translocations study has BIG message

Microclimate determines transplantation success

Associate Editor, Pieter De Frenne (Ghent University, Belgium) discusses assisted migration, climate change and the recent article by Brooker et al. Tiny niches and translocations: the challenge of identifying suitable recipient sites for small and immobile species. One of the key outstanding issues in applied ecology is to better inform land managers and policy makers how to adapt to climate change. Many species are currently shifting their … Continue reading Microclimate determines transplantation success