Repatriating solitary felids: the case for seeking homes for conflict-borne leopards in southern Africa

Photo © Vasti Botha Translocating large carnivores to reduce human-wildlife conflict have historically failed, but recent improvements in satellite technology have enabled better monitoring and success. In their latest research, Power et al. report on the outcomes of repatriating 16 leopards across a South African province. Leopards need little introduction. These large felids are ubiquitous across Africa and large parts of Asia. However, being so … Continue reading Repatriating solitary felids: the case for seeking homes for conflict-borne leopards in southern Africa

Trembling in the Balance: My life as a Black ecologist

For Black History Month, the British Ecological Society (BES) journals are celebrating the work of Black ecologists from around the world and sharing their stories. Christian Asante, a fifth year doctoral student at Boston College, shares his story below. I was born and raised in a sprawling urban neighbourhood in Ghana. My first awareness of nature as a child was birds flying headlong into my … Continue reading Trembling in the Balance: My life as a Black ecologist

Lionel Yamb: Saving sharks in Cameroon waters

For Black History Month, the British Ecological Society (BES) journals are celebrating the work of Black ecologists from around the world and sharing their stories. Lionel Yamb, who sits on the BES Equality and Diversity Working Group, shares his story below. My name is Lionel Yamb; I’m an early career marine ecologist working in Cameroon with the Institute of Agricultural Research for Development (IRAD). I … Continue reading Lionel Yamb: Saving sharks in Cameroon waters

Can ‘Citizen Scientists’ play a valid role in conservation management?

The emergence of citizen science in biodiversity monitoring has transformed the methods by which biodiversity surveys can be conducted. With the recent development of automatic visual identification tools, Pierre Bonnet and colleagues present two distinct case studies implementing citizen science and the use of Pl@ntNet, an automatic plant identification platform. This article is part of the BES cross-journal special feature on Citizen Science. Effective monitoring … Continue reading Can ‘Citizen Scientists’ play a valid role in conservation management?

Editor’s Choice 57:09 – Multi-species connectivity in a trans-frontier conservation landscape

As the September Editor’s Choice for Journal of Applied Ecology, research from Angela Brennan and colleagues moves away from a single-species approach and instead looks at movement corridors and connectivity on a large scale and across multiple species. Associate Editor, Kulbhushansingh Suryawanshi shares the important impact this could have on future conservation and development plans. Continue reading Editor’s Choice 57:09 – Multi-species connectivity in a trans-frontier conservation landscape

Behind the Cover 1:1 – Q&A with Alex Braczkowski

In this Q&A, we find out more about the author and research: “Detecting early warnings of pressure on an African lion (Panthera leo) population in the Queen Elizabeth Conservation Area, Uganda” behind the brilliant cover image of our inaugural issue. The research What’s your article about? Our article is about the status of African lions in western Uganda and how a recently developed population survey technique … Continue reading Behind the Cover 1:1 – Q&A with Alex Braczkowski

Unlocking Africa’s potential for citizen science

Judith Mirembe (NatureUganda) and Michael Pocock (Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, UK) share the outcomes of a recent workshop on the growth of citizen science in East Africa. Discover more details in their recent Policy Direction, free to read in Journal of Applied Ecology. Citizen science as an approach to environmental science and monitoring is growing in prominence across the world. Citizen science itself  is … Continue reading Unlocking Africa’s potential for citizen science

Long-term decline in prey increases predator competition

Bringing together data from a 50-year period to better-understand predator-prey interactions. Associate Editor, Matt Hayward discusses the recently published article, Changes in African large carnivore diets over the past half‐century reveal the loss of large prey by Creel et al. Much of our understanding of ecology comes from systems that are assumed to represent the way life has interacted for millennia. Yet this assumption is … Continue reading Long-term decline in prey increases predator competition

Where should we build wildlife crossings?

With wildlife crossing locations difficult to pinpoint, how do we know where to build crossing structures? Associate Editor, Manuela Gonzalez-Suarez explains how Bastille-Rousseau et al.’s new method and recent article, Optimizing the positioning of wildlife crossing structures using GPS telemetry help answer this question. There are over 40 million km of roads in the world (100 times the distance from the moon to Earth), with many millions … Continue reading Where should we build wildlife crossings?

Optimizing the positioning of wildlife crossing structures for African elephants in Northern Kenya

Wildlife crossing structures are considered critical for animal movement, but how  do you choose where best to build them? Guillaume Bastille-Rousseau presents tools for planning crossing structures and the recently published article, Optimizing the positioning of wildlife crossing structures using GPS telemetry. Linear infrastructure development, including transportation and economic corridors, is considered to have outsized ecological impacts relative to their small physical footprints. In sub-Saharan Africa, … Continue reading Optimizing the positioning of wildlife crossing structures for African elephants in Northern Kenya