Cover stories: escapes from aquaculture

Using the example of sturgeons in the Yangtze River and impacts on the critically endangered Chinese sturgeon, work by Rui-Ting Ju et al. looks into policies around escaping non-native species from aquaculture. The corresponding cover image for issue 57:01 was taken by Ping Zhuang. Sturgeon farming is expanding worldwide due to the overexploitation of wild stocks. In China, the main farmed species are non-native species … Continue reading Cover stories: escapes from aquaculture

Why ecology matters

This week, the British Ecological Society are attending New Scientist Live to showcase Incredible Creatures and bring ecological research to a wider audience. Focused across four zones; jungle, water, nocturnal, and people and nature, we’re excited to share the value of ecology in tackling the biggest challenges faced by our natural world. To celebrate this, we’ve brought together Why Ecology Matters; a selection of articles … Continue reading Why ecology matters

Go with the flow

Exploring the importance of autocorrelation in flow-ecology management, Associate Editor, Angela Strecker discusses the recent article by Bruckerhoff et al., Flow–ecology relationships are spatially structured and differ among flow regimes. In ecology, it is widely accepted that stream flow is a master variable for fishes. Human alterations to rivers have changed the flow regime significantly, often dampening the natural variability and changing the timing of … Continue reading Go with the flow

Video: Riverine ecosystem service quantification

Dalal Hanna et. al.’s paper, A review of riverine ecosystem service quantification: Research gaps and recommendations features in issue 55:3 of Journal of Applied Ecology. Watch this video to find out more. ‘Rivers provide numerous ecosystem services, including drinking water and irrigation. They also provide habitat to some our favourite food sources like fish, and places to go for fun recreational activities like swimming. To ensure … Continue reading Video: Riverine ecosystem service quantification

Tracking an apex marine predator – the shortfin mako shark

In this post Jeremy Vaudo and Mahmood Shivji discuss their article ‘Long-term satellite tracking reveals region-specific movements of a large pelagic predator, the shortfin mako shark, in the western North Atlantic Ocean’ In your paper you used satellite telemetry to investigate movements and seasonal distributions of shortfin mako sharks (Isurus oxyrinchus) in the western North Atlantic Ocean. What were the biggest challenges for this work? … Continue reading Tracking an apex marine predator – the shortfin mako shark

VIDEO: Saving seagrass isn’t just a pipefish dream – strategies to enhance its resilience

In this post Richard Unsworth discusses his recent Practitioner’s Perspective article with Leanne Cullen-Unsworth ‘Strategies to enhance the resilience of the world’s seagrass meadows‘ Over the last few years we’ve been increasingly interested by the #oceanoptimism movement on Twitter. It seeks to try and reframe the marine conservation story from a narrative of doom and gloom to one that seeks to see the positives in conservation around … Continue reading VIDEO: Saving seagrass isn’t just a pipefish dream – strategies to enhance its resilience

Lake Invaders! Can they get here and will they like it when they arrive?

In this post, Ben Stewart-Koster talks about his recent paper with Julian D. Olden & Pieter T.J. Johnson “Integrating landscape connectivity and habitat suitability to guide offensive and defensive invasive species management” Also, see the Associate Editor, Shelly Arnott’s blog post about this article “A practical guide to prioritize efforts to prevent the spread of invasive species“ Invasive species – these days they’re almost everywhere, and spreading … Continue reading Lake Invaders! Can they get here and will they like it when they arrive?