Bird communities in a land of droughts and flooding rains: riparian tree cover as climate refugia

In this post Dale Nimmo, Angie Haslem and Andrew Bennett discuss their recent paper ‘Riparian tree cover enhances the resistance and stability of woodland bird communities during an extreme climatic event’ You can also watch a slide cast about this research and related papers, in the form of an Australian bush poem. Something alarming happened in the woodlands of southern Australia last decade. The birds … Continue reading Bird communities in a land of droughts and flooding rains: riparian tree cover as climate refugia

Satellite-tagging the black kite

In this post Fabrizio Sergio discusses his recent paper ‘No effect of satellite tagging on survival, recruitment, longevity, productivity and social dominance of a raptor, and the provisioning and condition of its offspring’ Ecologists are using ever smaller and more sophisticated electronic devices to track the movements of animal species, even small songbirds and butterflies, all around the globe. These studies are producing leapfrog advances … Continue reading Satellite-tagging the black kite

How common birds and rainforests help cacao farmers in Indonesia

In this post, Bea Maas writes about her recent paper with Teja Tscharntke, Shahabuddin Saleh, Dadang Dwi Putra & Yann Clough “Avian species identity drives predation success in tropical cacao agroforestry“. Birds can make farmers happy. Due to their contribution to the suppression of pest insects in agriculture, their presence can increase the quality and quantity of crop yields. Especially in the tropics, insect eating birds … Continue reading How common birds and rainforests help cacao farmers in Indonesia

Can’t see the puffins for the auks? Estimating population size with imperfect species identification

In this post, Alison Johnston (@ali__johnston) talks about her paper published today “Modelling the abundance and distribution of marine birds accounting for uncertain species identification”. Ecological surveys balance the competing goals of data quality and data quantity. We can intensively survey a small area, or cover a larger area with less detail and precision, for example in large-scale citizen science surveys. Recently there has been … Continue reading Can’t see the puffins for the auks? Estimating population size with imperfect species identification

Energy production and wildlife: using syntheses for evidence-based decisions

In today’s post Chris Elphick (@ssts) discusses the recent review paper by Torre Hovick et al. and the importance of evidence-based syntheses for making informed decisions. This autumn, I saw my first Cape May warbler in the state where I live. Unfortunately, the sighting occurred when a colleague walked into my lab and handed me the corpse. Every year during migration, the ground around our … Continue reading Energy production and wildlife: using syntheses for evidence-based decisions

What does it take to save a hihi?

This post was written by Alienor Chauvenet (alienor.chauvenet@ioz.ac.uk, @AChauvenet) on her paper “Saving the hihi under climate change: a case for assisted colonization“, which was selected as Editor’s Choice and was a highly commended entry for the Journal of Applied Ecology‘s Southwood Prize 2013. I can imagine that your first reaction might be “what’s a hihi?!”. The hihi –or stitchbird- is an endemic passerine bird … Continue reading What does it take to save a hihi?

Pine Fiction: communicating research to a wider audience

Pine Fiction –a three minute stop-motion video by Alessio Mortelliti and Christina Thwaites. The aim of our video was to present the results of a relatively complex scientific study to a wider audience (to scientists and non-scientists) and to bring attention to the paper “Experimental evaluation shows limited influence of pine plantations on the connectivity of highly fragmented bird populations” by Alessio Mortelliti, Martin J. … Continue reading Pine Fiction: communicating research to a wider audience