Putting ecology theory to work: trends and opportunities in ecological restoration

Following her recently published Review, Links between community ecology theory and ecological restoration are on the rise, author Claire E. Wainright discusses taking a global perspective on restoration ecology. Community ecology and restoration ecology are often considered complementary fields. Ecologists recognize that the science of ecology provides solid conceptual foundations on which to construct hypothesis-driven restoration research. By extension, restoration offers unique opportunities to empirically … Continue reading Putting ecology theory to work: trends and opportunities in ecological restoration

How does one effectively engage communities for conservation? Try becoming PARTNERS

With a focus on community engagement, Matthias Fiechter, Charudutt Mishra, Steve Redpath, Brad Rutherford and Juliette Young, discuss the PARTNERS principle and importance of working with people towards conservation efforts. This post supports their recent Journal of Applied Ecology Practitioner’s Perspective, Building partnerships with communities for biodiversity conservation: lessons from Asian mountains. We’re currently witnesses to – and in many ways complicit in – the sixth mass … Continue reading How does one effectively engage communities for conservation? Try becoming PARTNERS

Northern mixed-grass prairie bounces back, but slowly: reflections on a 33 year long grazing experiment

In this post Julie Kray, Agricultural Science Research Technician, USDA-ARS & Lauren Porensky, Ecologist, USDA-ARS discuss the recent paper ‘Thresholds and gradients in a semi-arid grassland: long-term grazing treatments induce slow, continuous and reversible vegetation change’ How do we strike a balance between an economically sustainable amount of grazing, and an ecologically sustainable amount? This is the central challenge in managing grazed landscapes around the … Continue reading Northern mixed-grass prairie bounces back, but slowly: reflections on a 33 year long grazing experiment

Showing the way for carnivore conservation: lions can survive without fences with the help of Community Conservancies

In this post Sara Blackburn discusses her paper ‘Human–wildlife conflict, benefit sharing and the survival of lions in pastoralist community-based conservancies‘ Recent work on African lions indicates that they’re in trouble. Widespread declines have been identified across the continent, except in intensively managed fenced reserves, signposting a bleak future for free-ranging lions. This is due to conflict with people; lions kill livestock and, understandably, they … Continue reading Showing the way for carnivore conservation: lions can survive without fences with the help of Community Conservancies