Applied ecology in times of COVID-19

In these unusual and, often challenging times, Journal of Applied Ecology Senior Editor, Martin Nuñez raises the questions of how COVID-19 could influence the direction of, and priorities in, applied ecological research.  SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19 have drastically changed our lives and routines – as I write this, my two-year-old is desperate for me to make her a cheese empanada out of playdoh. Aside from the … Continue reading Applied ecology in times of COVID-19

Southwood Prize – Early career researcher award announced

Congratulations to Simon Clulow for winning this year’s Southwood Prize, Journal of Applied Ecology‘s award for the best paper by an early career researcher in the 55th (2018) volume of the journal. Simon’s winning paper, Elevated salinity blocks pathogen transmission and improves host survival from the global amphibian chytrid pandemic: Implications for translocations, shows that manipulating environmental salinity in landscapes where amphibians are translocated can … Continue reading Southwood Prize – Early career researcher award announced

Managing sites with ash dieback to conserve functional traits

Adopting a technique generally used in the social sciences but rarely in ecology, Louise Hill (University of Oxford) et al. provide a new summary for land managers looking to predict and manage the effects of ash dieback. Their work was recently published in Journal of Applied Ecology: Maintaining ecosystem properties after loss of ash in Great Britain. Ash dieback, an invasive disease of ash trees, is … Continue reading Managing sites with ash dieback to conserve functional traits

The devil is in the details: managing small populations to combat disease-led decline

Following the recent post by Billie Lazenby, Ellery McNaughton & Associate Editor Margaret Stanley share their thoughts on the article, Density trends and demographic signals uncover the long-term impact of transmissible cancer in Tasmanian devils and the importance of focusing on external threats to Tasmanian devils. New research by Lazenby et al. highlights the important interplay between disease ecology and population dynamics in informing conservation management. Wild … Continue reading The devil is in the details: managing small populations to combat disease-led decline

Process driving pattern: the long-term impact of a transmissible cancer on Tasmanian devils

Billie Lazenby (Save the Tasmanian Devil Program) discusses new research into devil facial tumour disease and the recent article, Density trends and demographic signals uncover the long-term impact of transmissible cancer in Tasmanian devils. Tracking population trends, particularly in response to a threat, is an essential component of conservation management. Moreover understanding what is driving these trends gives insight into whether they are likely to be … Continue reading Process driving pattern: the long-term impact of a transmissible cancer on Tasmanian devils

Issue 55:2

Issue 55:2 includes a Spotlight on Decision making under uncertainty. Other topics include urban ecology, population monitoring, tropical forest restoration and more. Here we take a look at some of the articles published in this issue. Decision making under uncertainty Senior Editor, Michael Bode on this issue’s selection of Spotlight papers How does grazing by wild ungulates and livestock affect plant richness? This issue’s Editor’s Choice Jaguar … Continue reading Issue 55:2

Spotlight: Forecasting and preventing the next outbreak – perspectives on infectious disease management

The Spotlight for issue 54:3 is on wildlife diseases. This post is written by Samantha Rumschlag and Jeremy Cohen. All five Spotlight papers are available to read here. In an ever-changing world, the risk of disease emergence is on the rise. As the climate warms, ranges of parasites and disease vectors are predicted to shift, exposing naïve populations to new threats. Humans are put in closer … Continue reading Spotlight: Forecasting and preventing the next outbreak – perspectives on infectious disease management