Editor’s Choice 57:09 – Multi-species connectivity in a trans-frontier conservation landscape

As the September Editor’s Choice for Journal of Applied Ecology, research from Angela Brennan and colleagues moves away from a single-species approach and instead looks at movement corridors and connectivity on a large scale and across multiple species. Associate Editor, Kulbhushansingh Suryawanshi shares the important impact this could have on future conservation and development plans. Continue reading Editor’s Choice 57:09 – Multi-species connectivity in a trans-frontier conservation landscape

Showcasing developments in biologging and related methods in applied ecology

Following the recent Journal of Animal Ecology Special Feature on biologging, Associate Editor, Steph Januchowski-Hartley takes a look at how research in this and similar methods are affecting the field of applied ecology today. Advances in technology have allowed for small electronic loggers and transmitters to be developed not only for biomedical monitoring for humans (think of the tech we can use for monitoring hearts, … Continue reading Showcasing developments in biologging and related methods in applied ecology

Optimally controlling invasive species in spatially-connected networks

In this post Sam Nicol discusses his recent article with Regis Sabbadin, Nathalie Peyrard and Iadine Chadès ‘Finding the best management policy to eradicate invasive species from spatial ecological networks with simultaneous actions‘ Lots of invasive species live in spatial networks, which means that they live in a series of discrete habitat sites, but occasionally move between the sites. Managing invasive species in these networks … Continue reading Optimally controlling invasive species in spatially-connected networks

New techniques for Atlantic sturgeon conservation

In this post Associate Editor Verena Trenkel discusses a paper she recently handled from Michael Melnychuk and colleagues ‘Informing conservation strategies for the endangered Atlantic sturgeon using acoustic telemetry and multi-state mark–recapture models‘ According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature (ICUN), ten out 17 sturgeon species are currently critically endangered. Among the two species listed as least concern is Atlantic sturgeon which occurs … Continue reading New techniques for Atlantic sturgeon conservation

Wolves prefer running in straight lines

In this post, Associate Editor Johan du Toit discusses a recent paper ‘Faster and farther: wolf movement on linear features and implications for hunting behaviour’ by Melanie Dickie, Robert Serrouya, Scott McNay and Stan Boutin. Humans make lines on the landscape When flying over any landscape, what strikes the eye as the most distinctive evidence of human activity on the ground is linear features in … Continue reading Wolves prefer running in straight lines

Why did the mammal cross the road?

A new long-term study from Canada explores the effectiveness of wildlife passages for smaller mammals. Check out the infographic below for a look at some of the major highlights and findings from the work. As you’ll see, at both the global and species level, some of the structural and environmental characteristics associated with the passages influenced the discovery (step 1) and use (step 2) of … Continue reading Why did the mammal cross the road?

Satellite-tagging the black kite

In this post Fabrizio Sergio discusses his recent paper ‘No effect of satellite tagging on survival, recruitment, longevity, productivity and social dominance of a raptor, and the provisioning and condition of its offspring’ Ecologists are using ever smaller and more sophisticated electronic devices to track the movements of animal species, even small songbirds and butterflies, all around the globe. These studies are producing leapfrog advances … Continue reading Satellite-tagging the black kite