How can we improve tree planting outcomes?

With a growing number of tree planting initiatives at regional to global scales, Karen Holl and Pedro Brancalion highlight in their latest research how planting trees is much more complicated than it seems. Here they share their findings, including guidelines to increase success of these ambitious efforts world-wide. Planting trees is so satisfying. You dig a hole, put a tree seedling in the ground, fill … Continue reading How can we improve tree planting outcomes?

Forests undergoing novel disturbances: understanding and managing the complex new reality of forests

Considering the vast impacts disturbances such as fire and insect outbreaks are having on forests worldwide, Alexandro B. Leverkus and Simon Thorn bring together a selection of work showcasing quality research into these disturbances and strategies being taken to manage them.

This Virtual Issue features articles from across the British Ecological Society journals that are free-to-read for a limited time. Continue reading Forests undergoing novel disturbances: understanding and managing the complex new reality of forests

Infographic: factors affecting carcass detection at wind farms using dogs and human searchers

New research from Jon Domínguez del Valle and colleagues demonstrates that dogs outperform humans when it comes to finding bird and bat carcasses in a wide range of situations. This is particularly evident when searching for small species in dense vegetation. This infographic summarises their work into detection at wind farms. ‘Our results provide evidence that dogs perform with high success rates at detecting bird … Continue reading Infographic: factors affecting carcass detection at wind farms using dogs and human searchers

Targeting survey and monitoring efforts on roads could help us better understand population changes in introduced carnivores

Carnivores usually occur over large areas in low numbers, which sometimes makes them difficult to find. In their recently published article, Hayley Geyle and colleagues assessed the effectiveness of different camera trap survey designs for detecting feral cats and red foxes, and looked at how this influenced their ability to determine whether populations had changed in response to control through time. Introduced carnivores in Australia … Continue reading Targeting survey and monitoring efforts on roads could help us better understand population changes in introduced carnivores

Black and white fragmentation maps can be misleading

Recent research from Marina Antongionanni and colleagues estimates 47,000 fragments of Caatinga dry forests to be affected by chronic human disturbances. Here the authors look at how such effects are depicted, and demonstrate how this knowledge can help define large-scale conservation and management actions. Continue reading Black and white fragmentation maps can be misleading

Behind the Cover 1:1 – Q&A with Alex Braczkowski

In this Q&A, we find out more about the author and research: “Detecting early warnings of pressure on an African lion (Panthera leo) population in the Queen Elizabeth Conservation Area, Uganda” behind the brilliant cover image of our inaugural issue. The research What’s your article about? Our article is about the status of African lions in western Uganda and how a recently developed population survey technique … Continue reading Behind the Cover 1:1 – Q&A with Alex Braczkowski

Editor’s Choice 57:08 – The mechanisms underlying crop colonisation, aggregation and damage in an insect pest

New research by Lauren Brzozowski and colleagues develops our understanding of how plant preference gradients mediate herbivore behaviour, and how this can ultimately help us manage crop damage from insect pests. Associate Editor, Ian Kaplan collaborates with Christie Shee to introduce our new Journal of Applied Ecology Editor’s Choice article, Attack and aggregation of a major squash pest: Parsing the role of plant chemistry and … Continue reading Editor’s Choice 57:08 – The mechanisms underlying crop colonisation, aggregation and damage in an insect pest

Protected high-value reefs and movement pathways improve conservation of reef sharks

New research from Gerardo Martín and colleagues looks at how we might support shark species if protected areas are multi-use and still open to fishing. The key is focusing on reefs preferred by sharks and developing our knowledge of shark movement pathways. Here the authors share their work and look at how we can improve species conservation while still supporting communities that depend on coral … Continue reading Protected high-value reefs and movement pathways improve conservation of reef sharks

Lessons from an exemplary private wildlife reserve in Spain

Global conservation targets mostly lean on public initiatives and resources but expanding conservation efforts to private land is paramount to halt biodiversity loss and recover wildlife. In their latest From Practice article, two applied scientists and two practitioners analyse a success story of a private wildlife reserve – the Los Barranquillos Wildlife Refuge in central Spain – which has been running for the past two … Continue reading Lessons from an exemplary private wildlife reserve in Spain