The need for a code of practice for mosquito management in European wetlands

Bringing together multidisciplinary expertise, Martinou et al. build a framework that aims to balance the priorities of wetland conservation and mosquito control.  

Wetlands provide essential resources to human societies, and the associated biodiversity associated with wetlands has an estimated value ranging from US $44,597- ($)195,478 per hectare per year. Governments around the world have enacted legislation, policies and regulations including the Clean Water Act (United States) and the Water Act (Australia) to protect wetlands from a variety of human activities. Continue reading The need for a code of practice for mosquito management in European wetlands

Private boats in the Mediterranean have extremely high potential to spread alien species

British Ecological Society press release A Mediterranean-wide study has found that 71% of sampled recreational boats hosted alien marine species. Over half carried an alien species that was not yet present in the marina the boat was visiting. The research is published in the British Ecological Society Journal of Applied Ecology. This is the first study in the Mediterranean to combine boat and marina sampling data … Continue reading Private boats in the Mediterranean have extremely high potential to spread alien species

Identifying fishery risk zones for seabird populations

Part of our Spotlight, Management of wide-ranging species, Thomas A. Clay explains how advances in remote tracking technology are offering us a glimpse into the mysterious life of the albatross in the hope of developing conservation measures to protect seabirds from bycatch risks. The authors have adapted this post from an article they previously shared with BirdLife International. Albatrosses are iconic voyagers, well known for … Continue reading Identifying fishery risk zones for seabird populations

Anyone’s game: do gamebird releases lead to increases in generalist predators?

In their new research, published this week, Henrietta Pringle and colleagues recommend the recording of gamebird releases and predator numbers. Every year, 40-50 million non-native gamebirds (ring-necked pheasant Phasianus colchius and red-legged partridge Alectoris rufa) are released in the UK, equivalent to around 46000 tonnes of biomass. Fewer than half these birds are shot, with the remaining birds predated, scavenged or surviving to breed or … Continue reading Anyone’s game: do gamebird releases lead to increases in generalist predators?

Is fencing the solution to human-elephant conflict?

Is fencing just a short-term solution for preventing human-wildlife conflict? In their recently published paper, Osipova et al. model the longer-term effects fencing can have on the vital movements of wildlife populations, using the African elephant as an example. See their work presented in this infographic: Read the full article, Fencing solves human‐wildlife conflict locally but shifts problems elsewhere: A case study using functional connectivity … Continue reading Is fencing the solution to human-elephant conflict?

Mitigating conflicts between agriculture and migratory geese: is shooting a viable option or just passing on the problem?

Following the recent article, Shooting may aggravate rather than alleviate conflicts between migratory geese and agriculture, Silke Bauer explains why management plans for migratory goose populations need to be considered across a broader scale. A challenge with developing management plans for migratory populations is that these populations use several sites in their annual cycle. Therefore, local actions may not only affect how migratory animals behave … Continue reading Mitigating conflicts between agriculture and migratory geese: is shooting a viable option or just passing on the problem?

Stress on the ski slope: individual capercaillies show different coping styles

As part of our cross-journal series for Endangered Species Day, Journal of Applied Ecology Associate Editor, Marc-André Villard considers Coppes et al.’s research around human-induced stress, and what this means for vulnerable populations. The full article, The importance of individual heterogeneity for interpreting faecal glucocorticoid metabolite levels in wildlife studies is available in Journal of Applied Ecology. Ecologists have long been aware that individual animals vary … Continue reading Stress on the ski slope: individual capercaillies show different coping styles

Where should we build wildlife crossings?

With wildlife crossing locations difficult to pinpoint, how do we know where to build crossing structures? Associate Editor, Manuela Gonzalez-Suarez explains how Bastille-Rousseau et al.’s new method and recent article, Optimizing the positioning of wildlife crossing structures using GPS telemetry help answer this question. There are over 40 million km of roads in the world (100 times the distance from the moon to Earth), with many millions … Continue reading Where should we build wildlife crossings?

Optimizing the positioning of wildlife crossing structures for African elephants in Northern Kenya

Wildlife crossing structures are considered critical for animal movement, but how  do you choose where best to build them? Guillaume Bastille-Rousseau presents tools for planning crossing structures and the recently published article, Optimizing the positioning of wildlife crossing structures using GPS telemetry. Linear infrastructure development, including transportation and economic corridors, is considered to have outsized ecological impacts relative to their small physical footprints. In sub-Saharan Africa, … Continue reading Optimizing the positioning of wildlife crossing structures for African elephants in Northern Kenya

Wind farms affect small birds too

Julia Gómez-Catasús explains the need for a 4.5km threshold between wind farms and small-sized birds, based on the recently published article, Wind farms affect the occurrence, abundance and population trends of small passerine birds: The case of the Dupont’s lark. Wind energy has experienced significant developments in recent decades, with China, United States, Germany, India and Spain being the main wind energy producers in the world. … Continue reading Wind farms affect small birds too