Cover stories: breeding songbirds alter their singing behaviour in selectively logged tropical forests

Song rates of male songbirds can serve as key indicators of territory quality for females. So what happens when intensive selective logging alters these rates? Rajeev Pillay and colleagues from the University of Florida and Universiti Malaysia Sabah summarise their recent research. *Update November 2019: following the publication of this blog post, the grey-headed canary-flycatcher photo below was selected as our November 2019 cover image. … Continue reading Cover stories: breeding songbirds alter their singing behaviour in selectively logged tropical forests

How to keep the mycorrhizae? The more hosts you leave, the more symbionts you get

How can tree retention mediate the effects of human-introduced disturbance on ectomycorrhizal fungi? Nahuel Policelli  and Senior Editor, Martin Nuñez discuss the recent article, The significance of retention trees for survival of ectomycorrhizal fungi in clear‐cut Scots pine forests. One of the most important above-belowground interactions is that between plants and mycorrhizal fungi. Acting as symbionts, mycorrhizal fungi are involved in plants’ nutrient uptake and … Continue reading How to keep the mycorrhizae? The more hosts you leave, the more symbionts you get

Editor’s Choice 56:1 – If a tree is felled in the forest, does anybody hear?

Investment in post-logging interventions may be the way to show people have heard, and perhaps more importantly, are acting. Jennifer Firn provides our first Editor’s Choice of Volume 56. The selected article is the Review, Actively restoring resilience in selectively logged tropical forests by Gianluca R. Cerullo and David P. Edwards. I think it’s safe to say you would be hard pressed to find an ecologist … Continue reading Editor’s Choice 56:1 – If a tree is felled in the forest, does anybody hear?

Demographic response to patch destruction in an endangered amphibian

Is rehabilitation always a good thing? Hugo Cayuela suggests alternative approaches for forest managers following the recently published article, Demographic response to patch destruction in a spatially structured amphibian population. Economic activities such as logging and mineral extraction can result in the creation of new anthropogenic habitats (e.g. temporary aquatic habitats) that may host specific biodiversity, including protected species. However, legislation in many Western European … Continue reading Demographic response to patch destruction in an endangered amphibian