Twenty years of tallgrass prairie restoration in northern Illinois, USA

Elizabeth Bach and Bill Kleiman share their latest findings from monitoring long-term ecosystem restoration on The Nature Conservancy’s Nachusa Grassland preserve. The challenges facing our planet can feel overwhelming and paralyzing. Climate is changing, biodiversity is declining, people are struggling to be in community with one another. However, there are signs of hope. The United Nations declared 2021-2030 as the Decade on Restoration, upholding ecosystem … Continue reading Twenty years of tallgrass prairie restoration in northern Illinois, USA

Connect the dogs: A framework to inform countrywide connectivity conservation of India’s wild dogs

Conserving threatened species requires taking a landscape or regional scale approach to maintain connectivity among populations. In a new study, Rodrigues and colleagues propose a framework for informing countrywide connectivity conservation for large carnivores, focusing on the endangered Asiatic wild dog in India. Why conserve connectivity? The increase in human footprint and rapid changes in land-use patterns threaten the existence of several endangered species. Recent … Continue reading Connect the dogs: A framework to inform countrywide connectivity conservation of India’s wild dogs

A framework to prioritize disease risk between wildlife and livestock

In their latest research, Khanyari and colleagues develop a three-step framework to assess cross-species disease transmission risk between migrating wildlife and livestock in data-limited circumstances and across social-ecological scale. Shared use of land between wildlife and livestock can lead to disease transmission, harming agricultural livelihoods and impacting wildlife conservation. This is especially problematic when endangered wildlife live in close proximity to largely resource poor people. … Continue reading A framework to prioritize disease risk between wildlife and livestock

Simple, low-cost tools can mitigate the negative impacts of climate change on incubating sea turtle clutches.

Successful incubation and production of male sea turtle hatchlings is threatened by increased global temperatures. In their latest research, Clarke and colleagues test the efficacy of two potential nest intervention approaches in reducing nest incubation temperatures in a nesting loggerhead turtle population in the Eastern Atlantic Ocean. Sea Turtles Are Vulnerable to Climate Change The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) predicts increases in global mean … Continue reading Simple, low-cost tools can mitigate the negative impacts of climate change on incubating sea turtle clutches.

Why ecology matters

This week, the British Ecological Society are attending New Scientist Live to showcase Incredible Creatures and bring ecological research to a wider audience. Focused across four zones; jungle, water, nocturnal, and people and nature, we’re excited to share the value of ecology in tackling the biggest challenges faced by our natural world. To celebrate this, we’ve brought together Why Ecology Matters; a selection of articles … Continue reading Why ecology matters

Spotlight: management of wide-ranging species

In issue 56:8 we showcase the research, technology and mitigation efforts going into the management of wide-ranging species today. Join Associate Editor, Johan du Toit in exploring this selection of work, free to read in the journal for a limited time. The ability to range widely across our planet conveys a game-changing advantage to certain animals, as was realised by humans when they discovered that … Continue reading Spotlight: management of wide-ranging species

Carnivores without borders: management of transboundary populations when objectives differ

Using the recent case study of wolverines in Scandinavia as an example, Associate Editor, Kulbhushansingh Suryawanshi highlights why management initiatives for transboundary populations need to collaborate across borders – and what happens when they don’t. Globally, carnivore conservation has two very different objectives. First, to protect the population of the carnivore species from going extinct. Second, to mitigate the impact of the carnivore on the … Continue reading Carnivores without borders: management of transboundary populations when objectives differ

Dynamic technology for dynamic ecosystems

When it comes to developing management tools, how do we keep up with constantly changing ecosystems? Associate Editor, Annabel Smith explains the important step forward made by Welch et al’s research into dynamic management tools. Scientists have been very good at developing guidelines for management of natural systems. Streams of conceptual frameworks are published every year, to the point that we now have frameworks for … Continue reading Dynamic technology for dynamic ecosystems

Editor’s Choice 55:5 – Value of information: when to learn and when to manage in conservation

The Editor’s Choice for issue 55:5 is written by Associate Editor, Hedley Grantham. The selected article is When to monitor and when to act: Value of information theory for multiple management units and limited budgets by Bennett et al. Investment in data can improve our understanding of which management actions provide the greatest cost benefits, where and when. But many management decisions are not based … Continue reading Editor’s Choice 55:5 – Value of information: when to learn and when to manage in conservation

Editor’s Choice 55:4 – Applying ecology to inform plant disease management policy and avoid regulator-grower conflict

The Editor’s Choice for issue 55:4 is written by Senior Editor, Phil Stephens. The selected article is Grower and regulator conflict in management of the citrus disease Huanglongbing in Brazil: A modelling study by Craig et al. Plant disease is already recognised as a major driver of crop yield losses. With a huge proportion of the growing human population’s food intake dependent on a relatively … Continue reading Editor’s Choice 55:4 – Applying ecology to inform plant disease management policy and avoid regulator-grower conflict