Bison vs. rabbits: the need for science-based management decisions in livestock–wildlife conflicts

In this post, Dustin Ranglack describes his recent paper with co-authors Susan Durham and Johan du Toit “Competition on the range: science vs. perception in a bison–cattle conflict in the western USA” In the western USA, few wildlife species are as controversial as American bison (Bison bison). Bison seem to be one of the few wildlife species that aren’t allowed to be wild. They are primarily … Continue reading Bison vs. rabbits: the need for science-based management decisions in livestock–wildlife conflicts

A dilemma in conservation practice

In this post, Johan du Toit, focuses on a dilemma in conservation practice: should we do what seems best now or gather more information to (maybe) come up with a better plan? Johan handled the recent paper by Sean Maxwell (@Sean_Ecology)  et al. “How much is new information worth? Evaluating the financial benefit of resolving management uncertainty.“ Conservation practitioners are continually confronted by the question of whether … Continue reading A dilemma in conservation practice

Energy production and wildlife: using syntheses for evidence-based decisions

In today’s post Chris Elphick (@ssts) discusses the recent review paper by Torre Hovick et al. and the importance of evidence-based syntheses for making informed decisions. This autumn, I saw my first Cape May warbler in the state where I live. Unfortunately, the sighting occurred when a colleague walked into my lab and handed me the corpse. Every year during migration, the ground around our … Continue reading Energy production and wildlife: using syntheses for evidence-based decisions

Are biologists just “tourists with binoculars”? Exploring the knowing-doing gap in tropical countries

Today’s post is a fascinating perspective on the knowing-doing gap from Anne Toomey. Anne also has her own blog: Science and the Community – Adventures in the Bolivian Amazon. In a recent issue of Journal of Applied Ecology, editor Philip Hulme wrote a piece on the increasingly discussed knowing-doing gap, in which there is a “clear mismatch between ecological knowledge generated by researchers and that … Continue reading Are biologists just “tourists with binoculars”? Exploring the knowing-doing gap in tropical countries

From economy to ecological management: Portfolio theory enlightens the performance of social-ecological systems

This guest post from David Angeler (@DGAngeler), Associate Editor for Journal of Applied Ecology on the paper “Performance of salmon fishery portfolios across western North America” by Jennifer Griffiths et al. (@JenAquatic @mark_scheuerell @SteveLindley831) Ecologists and managers are well aware of the reciprocal dependence of systems between people and nature. However, the linkages between social-ecological systems are complex and therefore difficult to measure. This limits … Continue reading From economy to ecological management: Portfolio theory enlightens the performance of social-ecological systems

Video: Plant diversity responses to organic farming and heterogeneity

Here’s a fantastic video from Romina Rader about her recently published paper “Organic farming and heterogeneous landscapes positively affect different measures of plant diversity“. Enjoy! You can also read more about the paper in this blog post from Journal Associate Editor Ailsa McKenzie. Continue reading Video: Plant diversity responses to organic farming and heterogeneity

Protecting freshwaters from forest harvesting

Most of us depend on paper, packaging, building materials and fuel wood. Forestry is an important industry, however, the impacts on freshwaters are immense and over the years forest managers have generally come to leave some trees alongside streams to protect freshwaters, i.e., riparian buffers. A new study by Richardson and Béraud shows that the impacts they are trying to protect against are more different … Continue reading Protecting freshwaters from forest harvesting