We may be underestimating the negative impacts of logging on the biodiversity of tropical forests

In this post Filipe França & Hannah Griffiths discuss their recent paper ’Do space-for-time assessments underestimate the impacts of logging on tropical biodiversity? An Amazonian case study using dung beetles The difficulty in developing strong researcher-practitioner relationships is a central ‘stumbling block’ in conservation science. Unfortunately this means that more often than not the policy implications of ecological research don’t reach the people responsible for … Continue reading We may be underestimating the negative impacts of logging on the biodiversity of tropical forests

Who should communicate the policy implications of ecological research?

This post, written by Journal of Applied Ecology Executive Editor, Marc Cadotte, has been reblogged, with permission, from The EEB & Flow. Ecology is a science that tries to understand the world. How is the diversity of organisms distributed around the world? How do extreme climate events influence populations of animals and plants? How does the diversity of organisms in a landscape influence its function … Continue reading Who should communicate the policy implications of ecological research?

VIDEO: Saving seagrass isn’t just a pipefish dream – strategies to enhance its resilience

In this post Richard Unsworth discusses his recent Practitioner’s Perspective article with Leanne Cullen-Unsworth ‘Strategies to enhance the resilience of the world’s seagrass meadows‘ Over the last few years we’ve been increasingly interested by the #oceanoptimism movement on Twitter. It seeks to try and reframe the marine conservation story from a narrative of doom and gloom to one that seeks to see the positives in conservation around … Continue reading VIDEO: Saving seagrass isn’t just a pipefish dream – strategies to enhance its resilience

Jazz-band ecosystem monitoring

In this post Adel Heenan and Kelvin Gorospe discuss their recent Practitioner’s Perspective article ‘Ecosystem monitoring for ecosystem-based management: using a polycentric approach to balance information trade-offs‘ Long-term ecosystem monitoring can be used to take the pulse of an ecosystem, much like a routine check-up with your doctor. Medical analogies like this are common in our field, as we work for the Pacific Reef Assessment and Monitoring Program (RAMP) … Continue reading Jazz-band ecosystem monitoring

Building better models for environmental decision-making: how can modellers & practitioners collaborate?

In this post, Kevin Wood describes a Practitioner’s Perspective article on the joint development of individual-based models between modellers and practitioners: “Co-creation of individual-based models by practitioners and modellers to inform environmental decision-making” by Wood, Stillman & Goss-Custard. We live in an age of environmental change unprecedented in human history. Such change is due to an array of factors including climate change, growing human population … Continue reading Building better models for environmental decision-making: how can modellers & practitioners collaborate?

Virtual Issue: Conservation evidence, decision-making and the role of scientific publications

At Journal of Applied Ecology, we’ve put together this Virtual Issue on Conservation evidence, decision making and the role of scientific publications to complement a one-day symposium on Conservation Evidence: informing decision making being held today by the British Ecological Society’s Conservation Special Interest Group and the Field Studies Council. All 16 papers are free to access and are brought together in an Editorial introduction by … Continue reading Virtual Issue: Conservation evidence, decision-making and the role of scientific publications

Are biologists just “tourists with binoculars”? Exploring the knowing-doing gap in tropical countries

Today’s post is a fascinating perspective on the knowing-doing gap from Anne Toomey. Anne also has her own blog: Science and the Community – Adventures in the Bolivian Amazon. In a recent issue of Journal of Applied Ecology, editor Philip Hulme wrote a piece on the increasingly discussed knowing-doing gap, in which there is a “clear mismatch between ecological knowledge generated by researchers and that … Continue reading Are biologists just “tourists with binoculars”? Exploring the knowing-doing gap in tropical countries

Special Profile: Putting applied ecology into practice

The latest issue of Journal of Applied Ecology was published this week and, along with the usual line-up of interesting research papers, reviews, and the Editor’s Choice, the issue also includes the Special Profile: Putting applied ecology into practice. This Special Profile is the output from a Journal-sponsored symposium held at INTECOL last year: Putting applied ecology into practice: knowledge and needs for the 21st … Continue reading Special Profile: Putting applied ecology into practice