Expanding communication and inclusion in applied ecology: lessons from the past and the path ahead

Journal of Applied Ecology’s outgoing and incoming Executive Editors, Marc Cadotte and Jos Barlow, take stock of the growth of the journal and how applied ecology has developed as a discipline in the past decade. They also look forward to innovative new projects and publications aiming to further support ecological researchers and practitioners.  Applied ecological research has never before been more germane to the management … Continue reading Expanding communication and inclusion in applied ecology: lessons from the past and the path ahead

The bear necessities of grizzly bear population recovery in Alberta, Canada

In our latest Practitioner’s Perspective, Towards grizzly bear population recovery in a modern landscape, Sean Coogan explains how new, multi-disciplinary approaches are being used to protect Canada’s threatened grizzly bears. The management and conservation of large carnivores can be socially controversial and politically charged. To make matters more complicated, the data required to make effective scientifically-informed management decisions may be lacking, or extremely difficult to … Continue reading The bear necessities of grizzly bear population recovery in Alberta, Canada

Greater than the sum of its parts: a holistic approach to wildlife trade

In this post, Daniel Bergin discusses issue 54.3’s Practitioner’s Perspective, Holistic management of live animals confiscated from illegal wildlife trade by Dr. Thomas Gray and colleagues. Armed detectives burst through the door. Traffickers are arrested, media coverage generated, and live animals are rescued from the illegal wildlife trade. But what happens next? What happens next is the focus of a new paper by Gray et. al., … Continue reading Greater than the sum of its parts: a holistic approach to wildlife trade

How does one effectively engage communities for conservation? Try becoming PARTNERS

With a focus on community engagement, Matthias Fiechter, Charudutt Mishra, Steve Redpath, Brad Rutherford and Juliette Young, discuss the PARTNERS principle and importance of working with people towards conservation efforts. This post supports their recent Journal of Applied Ecology Practitioner’s Perspective, Building partnerships with communities for biodiversity conservation: lessons from Asian mountains. We’re currently witnesses to – and in many ways complicit in – the sixth mass … Continue reading How does one effectively engage communities for conservation? Try becoming PARTNERS

Video: Managing animals confiscated from the illegal wildlife trade with the Wildlife Rapid Rescue Team

Following his work for the recent Practitioner’s Perspective, Holistic management of live animals confiscated from illegal wildlife trade, Wildlife Alliance’s Director of Science, Dr. Thomas Gray  describes the policy recommendations and conclusions from the paper from the Cardamom Rainforest Landscape in Cambodia. Watch the video and read Tom’s post below. Our Practitioner’s Perspective piece in the Journal of Applied Ecology addresses an often over-looked aspect of the war against … Continue reading Video: Managing animals confiscated from the illegal wildlife trade with the Wildlife Rapid Rescue Team

Maximising the policy impact of your scientific research

At the recent joint BES and CCI Symposium ‘Making a Difference in Conservation: Improving the Links Between Ecological Research, Policy and Practice’ Journal of Applied Ecology Executive Editor, Marc Cadotte, and Associate Editor and Policy Direction author, Sarah Durant coordinated a workshop on maximising the policy impact of scientific research. In recent years there has been an evolution of the types of papers journals publish … Continue reading Maximising the policy impact of your scientific research

We may be underestimating the negative impacts of logging on the biodiversity of tropical forests

In this post Filipe França & Hannah Griffiths discuss their recent paper ’Do space-for-time assessments underestimate the impacts of logging on tropical biodiversity? An Amazonian case study using dung beetles The difficulty in developing strong researcher-practitioner relationships is a central ‘stumbling block’ in conservation science. Unfortunately this means that more often than not the policy implications of ecological research don’t reach the people responsible for … Continue reading We may be underestimating the negative impacts of logging on the biodiversity of tropical forests

Who should communicate the policy implications of ecological research?

This post, written by Journal of Applied Ecology Executive Editor, Marc Cadotte, has been reblogged, with permission, from The EEB & Flow. Ecology is a science that tries to understand the world. How is the diversity of organisms distributed around the world? How do extreme climate events influence populations of animals and plants? How does the diversity of organisms in a landscape influence its function … Continue reading Who should communicate the policy implications of ecological research?

VIDEO: Saving seagrass isn’t just a pipefish dream – strategies to enhance its resilience

In this post Richard Unsworth discusses his recent Practitioner’s Perspective article with Leanne Cullen-Unsworth ‘Strategies to enhance the resilience of the world’s seagrass meadows‘ Over the last few years we’ve been increasingly interested by the #oceanoptimism movement on Twitter. It seeks to try and reframe the marine conservation story from a narrative of doom and gloom to one that seeks to see the positives in conservation around … Continue reading VIDEO: Saving seagrass isn’t just a pipefish dream – strategies to enhance its resilience

Jazz-band ecosystem monitoring

In this post Adel Heenan and Kelvin Gorospe discuss their recent Practitioner’s Perspective article ‘Ecosystem monitoring for ecosystem-based management: using a polycentric approach to balance information trade-offs‘ Long-term ecosystem monitoring can be used to take the pulse of an ecosystem, much like a routine check-up with your doctor. Medical analogies like this are common in our field, as we work for the Pacific Reef Assessment and Monitoring Program (RAMP) … Continue reading Jazz-band ecosystem monitoring