Anyone’s game: do gamebird releases lead to increases in generalist predators?

In their new research, published this week, Henrietta Pringle and colleagues recommend the recording of gamebird releases and predator numbers. Every year, 40-50 million non-native gamebirds (ring-necked pheasant Phasianus colchius and red-legged partridge Alectoris rufa) are released in the UK, equivalent to around 46000 tonnes of biomass. Fewer than half these birds are shot, with the remaining birds predated, scavenged or surviving to breed or … Continue reading Anyone’s game: do gamebird releases lead to increases in generalist predators?

Issue 55:6

Here are some of the highlights from our last issue of 2018 and our last issue to be published in print. You can also read issue 55:6 online here. Disentangling natural vs anthropogenic influences on predation: reducing impacts on sensitive prey Our latest Editor’s Choice article Cover stories: Cheetah chase Take a look at this selection of images telling the story behind our latest cover … Continue reading Issue 55:6

Editor’s Choice 55:6 -Disentangling natural vs anthropogenic influences on predation: reducing impacts on sensitive prey

The Editor’s Choice article for issue 55:6 is Broad‐scale occurrence of a subsidized avian predator: Reducing impacts of ravens on sage‐grouse and other sensitive prey by O’Neil et al. Associate Editor Margaret Stanley explains the importance of this paper and the disentanglement of natural and anthropogenic influences. As a researcher who often fixates on invasive predators, the tricky issues associated with natural predation, from native predators that … Continue reading Editor’s Choice 55:6 -Disentangling natural vs anthropogenic influences on predation: reducing impacts on sensitive prey

Focus on the predators: an in-depth look at songbird nest predation

Associate Editor, Marc-André Villard discusses the tricky business of managing nest predation and the recent article by Chiavacci et al. Linking landscape composition to predator-specific nest predation requires examining multiple landscape scales. Predation is, by far, the main cause of nest failure in songbirds.  Therefore, it is important to understand the factors putting certain species (or their nests) at risk.  For decades, researchers have tried to identify … Continue reading Focus on the predators: an in-depth look at songbird nest predation

Why hirola are the world’s most endangered antelope, and what it will take to save them – with Somali translation

In this post Jacob Goheen and Abdullahi Ali discuss their recent paper ‘Resource selection and landscape change reveal mechanisms suppressing population recovery for the world’s most endangered antelope‘. Ali has also provided a Somali translation of this post. Journal of Applied Ecology is dedicated to making papers more accessible and increasing engagement with those in the region of the study. We encourage authors to write … Continue reading Why hirola are the world’s most endangered antelope, and what it will take to save them – with Somali translation

Tracking an apex marine predator – the shortfin mako shark

In this post Jeremy Vaudo and Mahmood Shivji discuss their article ‘Long-term satellite tracking reveals region-specific movements of a large pelagic predator, the shortfin mako shark, in the western North Atlantic Ocean’ In your paper you used satellite telemetry to investigate movements and seasonal distributions of shortfin mako sharks (Isurus oxyrinchus) in the western North Atlantic Ocean. What were the biggest challenges for this work? … Continue reading Tracking an apex marine predator – the shortfin mako shark

The Web Of Life: Understanding Complex Animal Relationships for Applied Conservation

In this post Susan Cheyne, who is taking part in our Associate Editor mentoring opportunity discusses a paper she recently handled by Paula Perrig and colleagues ‘Puma predation subsidizes an obligate scavenger in the high Andes‘ Of great interest in understanding biological systems is the often complex interplay between animals occupying different niches. Past studies involving ecological indicators of ecosystem function have selected individual indicator … Continue reading The Web Of Life: Understanding Complex Animal Relationships for Applied Conservation

Wolves prefer running in straight lines

In this post, Associate Editor Johan du Toit discusses a recent paper ‘Faster and farther: wolf movement on linear features and implications for hunting behaviour’ by Melanie Dickie, Robert Serrouya, Scott McNay and Stan Boutin. Humans make lines on the landscape When flying over any landscape, what strikes the eye as the most distinctive evidence of human activity on the ground is linear features in … Continue reading Wolves prefer running in straight lines

The rise and fall of a simple solution

In this post Anna-Sara Liman discusses her recent paper ‘Predator refuges for conservation biological control in an intermediately disturbed system: the rise and fall of a simple solution‘ The first so called willow “energy forests” were planted in Sweden (and the UK) in the early nineties and represent among the first steps towards development of a bioenergy sector and a future bioeconomy. Willows are fast-growing … Continue reading The rise and fall of a simple solution

Showing the way for carnivore conservation: lions can survive without fences with the help of Community Conservancies

In this post Sara Blackburn discusses her paper ‘Human–wildlife conflict, benefit sharing and the survival of lions in pastoralist community-based conservancies‘ Recent work on African lions indicates that they’re in trouble. Widespread declines have been identified across the continent, except in intensively managed fenced reserves, signposting a bleak future for free-ranging lions. This is due to conflict with people; lions kill livestock and, understandably, they … Continue reading Showing the way for carnivore conservation: lions can survive without fences with the help of Community Conservancies