Repatriating solitary felids: the case for seeking homes for conflict-borne leopards in southern Africa

Photo © Vasti Botha Translocating large carnivores to reduce human-wildlife conflict have historically failed, but recent improvements in satellite technology have enabled better monitoring and success. In their latest research, Power et al. report on the outcomes of repatriating 16 leopards across a South African province. Leopards need little introduction. These large felids are ubiquitous across Africa and large parts of Asia. However, being so … Continue reading Repatriating solitary felids: the case for seeking homes for conflict-borne leopards in southern Africa

Applied ecology in times of COVID-19

In these unusual and, often challenging times, Journal of Applied Ecology Senior Editor, Martin Nuñez raises the questions of how COVID-19 could influence the direction of, and priorities in, applied ecological research.  SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19 have drastically changed our lives and routines – as I write this, my two-year-old is desperate for me to make her a cheese empanada out of playdoh. Aside from the … Continue reading Applied ecology in times of COVID-19

Poaching problems? More rangers, please…

Sharing his insights into on-the-ground conservation, Maarten Hofman (University of Goettingen, Germany & Bangor University, UK) discusses Moore et al.’s recent article, Are ranger patrols effective in reducing poaching-related threats within protected areas, and the wider implications for tackling illegal poaching. Rangers are the heavy duty machinery in every protected area management’s human resource arsenal. Their list of duties ranges from public outreach and environmental … Continue reading Poaching problems? More rangers, please…

Greater than the sum of its parts: a holistic approach to wildlife trade

In this post, Daniel Bergin discusses issue 54.3’s Practitioner’s Perspective, Holistic management of live animals confiscated from illegal wildlife trade by Dr. Thomas Gray and colleagues. Armed detectives burst through the door. Traffickers are arrested, media coverage generated, and live animals are rescued from the illegal wildlife trade. But what happens next? What happens next is the focus of a new paper by Gray et. al., … Continue reading Greater than the sum of its parts: a holistic approach to wildlife trade