The hidden benefits of chocolate: cacao agroforests offer a conservation solution that supports biodiversity and livelihoods.

New work by Arnold and colleagues shows that sustainably grown cacao is a conservation solution which can support both people and nature, and that cacao agroforests and secondary forest can enrich regional biodiversity. Conservation initiatives have traditionally focused on protecting untouched natural areas. While this is important, we also need to understand how biodiversity can be promoted not as an alternative to human use of … Continue reading The hidden benefits of chocolate: cacao agroforests offer a conservation solution that supports biodiversity and livelihoods.

Ecological Solutions and Evidence Prize 2020: early career researcher winner announced

We’re excited to announce Christina Service as the winner of the inaugural Ecological Solutions and Evidence Prize, celebrating the best Research Article in the journal by an author at the start of their career. Winner: Christina Service Research: “Spatial patterns and rarity of the white‐phased ‘Spirit bear’ allele reveal gaps in habitat protection” About the research While the American black bear (Ursus americanus) is a … Continue reading Ecological Solutions and Evidence Prize 2020: early career researcher winner announced

Simple, low-cost tools can mitigate the negative impacts of climate change on incubating sea turtle clutches.

Successful incubation and production of male sea turtle hatchlings is threatened by increased global temperatures. In their latest research, Clarke and colleagues test the efficacy of two potential nest intervention approaches in reducing nest incubation temperatures in a nesting loggerhead turtle population in the Eastern Atlantic Ocean. Sea Turtles Are Vulnerable to Climate Change The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) predicts increases in global mean … Continue reading Simple, low-cost tools can mitigate the negative impacts of climate change on incubating sea turtle clutches.

Investigating the effects of fire management on savanna biodiversity with grid‐based spatially explicit population simulations

The development of effective fire management regimes is a global challenge. New research from Davies and colleagues aims to develop a flexible modelling approach to investigate how the spatiotemporal application of fire influences savanna biodiversity. Despite the integral role that fire plays in the functioning of ecosystems around the world, there remain few areas where the occurrence of fire has not been disrupted, in some … Continue reading Investigating the effects of fire management on savanna biodiversity with grid‐based spatially explicit population simulations

Editor’s Choice 57:09 – Multi-species connectivity in a trans-frontier conservation landscape

As the September Editor’s Choice for Journal of Applied Ecology, research from Angela Brennan and colleagues moves away from a single-species approach and instead looks at movement corridors and connectivity on a large scale and across multiple species. Associate Editor, Kulbhushansingh Suryawanshi shares the important impact this could have on future conservation and development plans. Continue reading Editor’s Choice 57:09 – Multi-species connectivity in a trans-frontier conservation landscape

New study reveals rarity of the Spirit Bear and gaps in their protection in Canada’s Great Bear Rainforest

In their latest research, Service and colleagues map the distribution and frequency of the ‘Spirit bear’ allele to support conservation planning of these culturally important phenotypic variants. Author Christina Service shares her team’s findings below. Continue reading New study reveals rarity of the Spirit Bear and gaps in their protection in Canada’s Great Bear Rainforest

Camera traps reveal hidden treasures of the rainforest

In their new research, Mattia Bessone and colleagues demonstrate how camera trap distance sampling can be used to develop conservation strategies and protect threatened species. The impact humans are exerting on the planet is accelerating the loss of biodiversity, with animal species disappearing at such unprecedented rate that scientists have labelled the current era ‘Earth’s sixth mass extinction’. To preserve the remnants of wildlife we … Continue reading Camera traps reveal hidden treasures of the rainforest

Wildlife conservation modelling and Payment for Ecosystem Services schemes

Payments for Ecosystem Services (PES) schemes are a way of bringing potential ‘buyers’ and ‘sellers’ of ecosystem services together for a mutually beneficial exchange. In their recently published work, Kragt and colleagues present an ecological model in the Lao People’s Democratic Republic that predicts how community-based patrolling can protect critically endangered species from poaching. Here they show how this model could benefit PES schemes. Laos … Continue reading Wildlife conservation modelling and Payment for Ecosystem Services schemes

Editor’s Choice 56:12 – Do introduced apex predators suppress introduced mesopredators? The debate continues

Our December Editor’s Choice by Fancourt et al. indicates that the presence of dingoes in Australia is unlikely to suppress introduced feral cats. Associate Editor, Michael Bode, looks at the evidence in this new research and explains why he feels the debate around this topic is far from over. In recent times, Australia has had one of the worst records of extinction in the world. … Continue reading Editor’s Choice 56:12 – Do introduced apex predators suppress introduced mesopredators? The debate continues

If some species extinctions are the result of bad luck, what does this mean for conservation?

Kevin Smith and Ryan Almeida take a look at how we can predict and manage extinction risk.  Here’s a thought experiment for you: ask a few people the question, ‘What was it about the dodo that led it to go extinct’? Compare your answers. Based on our experience, your friends and colleagues are likely to cite some of the dodo’s traits that they feel like … Continue reading If some species extinctions are the result of bad luck, what does this mean for conservation?